Solve it Sunday: Ciphertext

Hello my dear Sherlocks, I have a simple cipher for you to solve today.

If you don’t know what that means, basically the letters in the cipher have been moved around out of order.

Good luck solving it, and as always, the answer is in the comments!

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In this puzzle, the challenge is to decrypt a quotation that has been made obscure by the use of a simple cipher. Are you able to work out what it says?

ERUSSERP EVAW FO NOITAIRAV A SA YN
OHPMYS NEVOHTEEB A DEBIRCSED UOY F
I SA GNINAEM TUOHTIW EB DLUOW TI E
SNES ON EKAM DLUOW TI TUB YLLACIFI
TNEICS GNIHTYREVE EBIRCSED OT ELBI
SSOP EB DLUOW TI

BEST OF LUCK!

Movie Review: Kiki’s Delivery Service

Hello dear Ghibli fans, I come to you this week with a review of Kiki’s Delivery Service.

If you don’t know by now, I am slowly making my way through the Studio Ghibli catalog and reviewing each of the movies. So far I’ve reviewed: Spirited Away, My Neighbor Totoro and Ponyo.

If you like this review, make sure to follow my blog and social channels!
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Title: Kiki’s Delivery Service
Director: Hayao Miyazaki
Rating: ★★★★☆
Buy it here

13-year-old Kiki moves to a seaside town with her talking cat, Jiji, to spend a year alone, in accordance with her village’s tradition for witches in training. After learning to control her broomstick, Kiki sets up a flying courier service and soon becomes a fixture in the community. But when the insecure young witch begins questioning herself and loses her magic abilities, she must overcome her self-doubt to get her powers back.

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Simple is Best

Kiki’s Delivery Service is a perfect example of why I love movies with a simple premise. Often it’s thriller movies with a simple but intriguing concept that I like the most, but Kiki follows the same principle.

Its premise is simple, but the storytelling possibilities are endless, and that’s what makes it beautiful. It could have been a much more confusing movie. With magic and technology working hand in hand, the world building could have been a lot more in-depth, but it didn’t need to be. It fit perfectly to the feel of the movie, and I wouldn’t ask for it to be any more in-depth than it is.


Coming of Age

This theme seems to be quite common for Ghibli movies, and its amazing to see it in so many different ways.

It’s quite a common theme in storytelling, but it’s effective. When done well it can get you to relate with the characters, and you see their growth.

Kiki’s Delivery Service tells a great coming of age story, despite some parts being a bit unbelievable. We see a strong, determined Kiki go through struggles and fears to push through them and become a strong young woman in her own right.


Soft Magic

Kiki’s Delivery Service, like many of the Studio Ghibli movies has magic involved, but we never really get any explanation of it. We don’t get the rules of who can do what sort of magic, all we get is that people can do magic.

Magic can often be used as a storytelling device, which it is in Kiki’s case, but it doesn’t grow with our characters. Our characters don’t get stronger the further into the story we get, they just embrace their powers and use them as a part of themselves.


Final Thoughts

Kiki’s Delivery Service is a great movie that is obviously family friendly. If you can get past the “old-school” animation style it’s a great movie to cuddle up on the couch with and enjoy one night.

It’s not only enjoyable and fun, but it teaches some great lessons for kids to learn.


Quotes from The Way of Kings by Brandon Sanderson

Hello dear readers, I have combed the pages of Sanderson and the internet to find some of the best quotes from The Way of Kings for you.

I hope you enjoy, and make sure to follow my blog and social media for more great quotes!

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“The purpose of a storyteller is not to tell you how to think, but to give you questions to think upon.” 
― Brandon Sanderson, The Way of Kings

“Life before Death.
Strength before Weakness.
Journey before Destination.” 
― Brandon Sanderson, The Way of Kings

“Sometimes the prize is not worth the costs. The means by which we achieve victory are as important as the victory itself.” 
― Brandon Sanderson, The Way of Kings

“To lack feeling is to be dead, but to act on every feeling is to be a child.”
― Brandon Sanderson, The Way of Kings


“Expectations were like fine pottery. The harder you held them, the more likely they were to crack.” 
― Brandon Sanderson, The Way of Kings

“Somebody has to start. Somebody has to step forward and do what is right, because it is right.” 
― Brandon Sanderson, The Way of Kings

“In the end, all men die. How you lived will be far more important to the Almighty than what you accomplished.” 
― Brandon Sanderson, The Way of Kings

“Ah, the outdoors,’ Shallan said. ‘I visited that mythical place once.” 
― Brandon Sanderson, The Way of Kings

“Strength does not make one capable of rule; it makes one capable of service.” 
― Brandon Sanderson, The Way of Kings

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“Authority doesn’t come from a rank.,” Kaladin said, fingering the spheres in his pocket.
“Where does it come from?”
“From the men who give it to you. That’s the only way to get it.” 
― Brandon Sanderson, The Way of Kings

“The hallmark of insecurity is bravado.” 
― Brandon Sanderson, The Way of Kings

― Brandon Sanderson, The Way of Kings

“Overcome your guilt. Care, but not too much. Take responsibility, but don’t blame yourself. Protect, save, help- but know when to give up. They’re precarious ledges to walk. How do I do it?” 
― Brandon Sanderson, The Way of Kings


“An excuse is what you make after the deed is done, while a justification is what you offer before.” 
― Brandon Sanderson, The Way of Kings

“I will protect those who cannot protect themselves.
― Brandon Sanderson, The Way of Kings

“Bitterness is repaid more often than kindness.” 
― Brandon Sanderson, The Way of Kings

“Sometimes we find it hardest to accept in others that which we cling to in ourselves.” 
― Brandon Sanderson, The Way of Kings


“Let your actions defend you, not your words.” 
― Brandon Sanderson, The Way of Kings

“What is it we value? Innovation. Originality. Novelty. But most importantly…timeliness. I fear you may be too late, my confused, unfortunate, friend.” 
― Brandon Sanderson, The Way of Kings

“Everything is a contest. All dealings among men are a contest in which some will succeed and others fail. And some are failing quite spectacularly.” 
― Brandon Sanderson, The Way of Kings

“Well, I myself find that respect is like manure. Use it where needed, and growth will flourish. Spread it on too thick, and things just start to smell.” 
― Brandon Sanderson, The Way of Kings


“I point out truths when I see them, Brightlord Sadeas. Each man has his place. Mine is to make insults. Yours is to be in-sluts.” 
― Brandon Sanderson, The Way of Kings

“There is no greater indication of youth, perhaps, than the desire for everything to be as it should.” 
― Brandon Sanderson, The Way of Kings

“Words aren’t meant to be kept inside, you see. They are free creatures, and if locked away will unsettle the stomach.” 
― Brandon Sanderson, The Way of Kings

“Can’t be any harder than sitting here and having a staring contest with mortality.” 
― Brandon Sanderson, The Way of Kings


My Predictions for the Book World in the 2020s

Hello dear readers, I have a post that I’ve been wanting to write for a while for you today.

I was looking back at my childhood and remembering books and publishing from when I was a kid and how it has changed since then.

That got me thinking about what I think will happen in the next ~10 years in the publishing world.

These are just things that I think will happen. If I happen to be correct, then good for me, if I am not, then oh well.

What are your predictions for the book world? Do you agree or disagree with any of my predictions? Let’s talk about it in the comments, and make sure to follow me on social media!
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Physical Books

I don’t foresee any major change in this department. I think the printing of physical books has found a happy medium in terms of sales. There might be some spikes and some lows of people buying physical books, but it will more or less stay the same with maybe a small growth.

I find a lot of less serious readers prefer to have a physical book in their hands because they don’t see the need for an e-reader. A lot of book bloggers/tubers also seem to like getting their hands on physical books, though plenty like e-books too.


e-Books

I think the demand for e-books will continue to grow at a steady pace. It is becoming a much more affordable and portable way to read. If authors and publishers want to keep e-readers happy though, I think they will need to find ways to ensure more accessible files for their e-books, which brings me to my second point.

I think we will see more variety in types of e-readers. I think a few companies will develop their own version of a Kindle, with unique features specific to their brand, which will give readers cheaper options that might fit their needs/wants better. Two companies that I believe could pursue this path are Google and Microsoft, but also possibly an out of the blue small company that focuses solely on e-readers.


Audiobooks

Audiobooks will continue to grow and become more mainstream. Audiobook services will be easier to obtain for smaller authors, and audiobook narrators will be more sought after.

I think there will be more of a division between narrators though, with a small group of narrators being regularly sought after, and listeners will look for books by those specific narrators.

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Publishing

With the Black Lives Matter movement across the world, I expect to see better diversity in publishing. It’s not something that happens overnight, but I expect by 2025-7 we will see more equality between what peoples are being published. I expect there to be ups and downs, some being lower and higher based off of social upbringings, but for the most part we will see more equality.


Writing

I actually predict that writing will become less of a career path for many people. With the rise of technology and video games I think that young people won’t pursue writing as often since they won’t be reading as much.

What we will see a rise in is the number of non-white authors. I think as publishing better represents minorities, those minorities will see writing as a tangible career choice.


Adaptations

Already there are a lot of TV shows and movies that are based off of books and I think this will only continue to rise. The o only issue is that these companies too often re-make old content because they know it will make them money.

With more ideas coming from authors with a large variety of backgrounds, the entertainment industry will be forced to turn them into movies and TV shows.

I also think that books will start getting video game adaptations. I don’t see this becoming a regular habit until the late 2020s, but I think there is a lot of potential for really fun video-games that could become best-sellers if they are dated from books. Look at the Witcher Series for example.


Marketing

It’s tough to market books, there isn’t much you can do that would be new in my opinion. I think marketers will embrace certain styles of books, or books with certain voices and characters in them.


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Overall

I don’t see much of a change for the book world overall in the next 10 years except becoming more inclusive. We will see a change in stories and trends, but for the most part I don’t see things changing.

If I had to make one big guess, I would assume that the desire for YA content will be greater than ever. YA content is almost universally read so publishers will pursue it as a safe bet.


What are your predictions for the book world? Do you agree or disagree with any of my predictions? Let’s talk about it in the comments, and make sure to follow me on social media!
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Happy Canada Day

This isn’t a very bookish related post, and it will be rather short.

July 1, 2020 is the 153rd anniversary of Canada’s founding as a country.

For some this is good news, for others it is a sign of pain and suffering that has been lasting generations.

I am not an expert on the subject by any means, and quite a few people would have choice words with what I’m about to say I’m sure, but I am proud to be Canadian.

No person, family, city, state, or country, there will always be things that can be improved on. I recognize that Canada has made many mistakes in the past, and I am sure we will make many more.

At the end of the day, it is a nation that has brought hope and happiness to hundreds of thousands of people across the world.

It might not be a perfect nation, it owes a lot to the Indigenous peoples that were here before, but it does do good in the world.

Every day I work to become a better, more understanding, more knowledgable individual. It doesn’t happen overnight, but if everyone tries to see the world in a different way, we can all create a better society.

My 10 Most Anticipated Releases for the Second Half of 2020

Hello dear readers, welcome back to another Top 10 Tuesday. Thank you to That Artsy Reader Girl for the topic as always!

I normally don’t do these when the topic is June TBR, Summer Books to Read, etc. because I don’t read as much as other people do, so I’d have maybe one or two books on the list, which wouldn’t be fun for anyone.

BUT, I’ve been reading a lot more this year than I normally do, thanks to book blogging, so I figured a six-month time period would be enough to make a solid list about.

What books are you planning to read in the rest of 2020? Have you read any of the ones on my list? Let’s talk about it.

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Of Myth and Shadow by Matthew S. Cox – I’m about a quarter of the way through this book, which I’ve been told is 1400+ pages long. I have a blog tour coming up for this book and it’s an interesting read to say the least.

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Dread Pirate Arcanist, Coliseum Arcanist, Plague Arcanist by Shami Stovall. I loved Knightmare Arcanist, the first book in this series, and the books are a quick and fun read. I plan on getting through them pretty quickly in the rest of 2020.


Heir of Doom by Jina. S Bazzar. I enjoyed the first one in this series quite a bit, and the author approached me to read the second one. I feel bad because it keeps getting pushed back in my TBR, but I will read it soon!


Mo Dao Zu Shi by Mo Xiang Tong Xiu. This one was recommended to me by one of my blogging friends Kat @ Kbookreviews. She said I would enjoy it, and since I don’t read a lot of Eastern Fantasy, that it would be good to expand my horizons.


The Fifth Season, The Obelisk Gate, The Stone Sky by N.K. Jemisin. I read some of Jemisin in university and I loved her work. It was such an interesting take on fantasy that I wanted to read more by her. I’ve heard each of these books are fantastic to read and might leave me feeling empty inside because of the emotions.


A Court of Thorns and Roses by Sarah J. Maas. This is another series I’ve heard a lot of good things about, so I am excited to get into it, but I don’t want to commit to the whole series quite yet because I have also hear some not-too-good things about it too. Hopefully those ones are wrong.


What books are on your TBR for the rest of the year? Let’s talk about it in the comments, and make sure to follow me on social media!
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Book Review: The Way of Kings

Hello dear readers, I have technically reviewed this book before on my blog, but I did the entire series in one review.

Now that the fourth book in the series; Rhythm of War (order through the link), is coming out in the fall, I knew I had to give each book the proper review it deserved.

Because of that, it’s time to review the first book in the series, The Way of Kings. I hope you enjoy because this book series is in my top three of all time.

Title: The Way of Kings
Author: Brandon Sanderson
Rating: ★★★★.5☆
Buy: The Way of Kings
Pre-order: Rhythm of War

According to mythology mankind used to live in The Tranquiline Halls. Heaven. But then the Voidbringers assaulted and captured heaven, casting out God and men. Men took root on Roshar, the world of storms. And the Voidbringers followed…

They came against man ten thousand times. To help them cope, the Almighty gave men powerful suits of armor and mystical weapons, known as Shardblades. Led by ten angelic Heralds and ten orders of knights known as Radiants, mankind finally won.

Or so the legends say. Today, the only remnants of those supposed battles are the Shardblades, the possession of which makes a man nearly invincible on the battlefield. The entire world is at war with itself – and has been for centuries since the Radiants turned against mankind. Kings strive to win more Shardblades, each secretly wishing to be the one who will finally unite all of mankind under a single throne.

On a world scoured down to the rock by terrifying hurricanes that blow through every few day a young spearman forced into the army of a Shardbearer, led to war against an enemy he doesn’t understand and doesn’t really want to fight.

What happened deep in mankind’s past?

Why did the Radiants turn against mankind, and what happened to the magic they used to wield?


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Sanderson Magic System

It’s no surprise that Brandon Sanderson is my favourite author. I love the way he can craft such beautiful worlds based off of a simple thing like a magic system.

I would say that The Way of King’s is the best of his magic systems. Not only does it affect how some of the heroes fight, which magic systems are almost always used for, but it also affects the important details of the world; money, light sources, societal class, and scientific advancement.

I love a well developed magic system when all it does is allow characters to fight, but when it literally runs the way the world works, it becomes so much more interesting.

What’s the most beautiful about this magic system is that it is simple. Yes it can be built upon and developed the more we learn about the story, but the core principles of it are as simple as 1 + 1.


A Fraction of the World

I love exploring new worlds in books. It’s one of the reasons I love reading so much.

A lot, if not all, stories have a sliver of our world in them. That might be an inspiration of a name, a location, or even an event.

There’s plenty of that in The Way of Kings, and that’s why I love it. There’s class issues, slavery, issues related to the death and punishment, women’s place in the world, and plenty more.

The fact that a story can deal with issues like that while telling an epic tale amazes me.

What’s even more wonderful is that we are only discovering a fraction of the world. We get MAYBE a tenth of the entire story, and so much is left as a mystery to us.


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Mental Health is Important

Maybe I read a very narrow scope of books that don’t talk about mental health issues (other than books specifically about it).

It’s not an issue that is common in the books I read, but The Way of Kings touched it in a nice subtle way. It doesn’t outright state that one of the main characters has any mental health issues, but you see it in the way he interacts with the world and how his mind sees everything he does.

I don’t think there’s a perfect way to tell those stories, because it is a different experience for everyone. What is important is getting the idea out there, so that other people know that it is normal, even if it isn’t the same experience that they have.


Final Thoughts

The only thing I didn’t like about The Way of Kings was that I had a bit of a hard time following along at first. It had moments later on where I literally jumped out of my seat when I was reading, but it took me a while to understand the story.

Because of that, it took me a while to really commit myself to reading it, but when I did I was hooked.


What did you think of The Way of Kings?? If you love epic fantasy it needs to be on your TBR radar. The series just continues to get better. Make sure to follow me on social media for more book reviews!
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