My Predictions for the Book World in the 2020s

Hello dear readers, I have a post that I’ve been wanting to write for a while for you today.

I was looking back at my childhood and remembering books and publishing from when I was a kid and how it has changed since then.

That got me thinking about what I think will happen in the next ~10 years in the publishing world.

These are just things that I think will happen. If I happen to be correct, then good for me, if I am not, then oh well.

What are your predictions for the book world? Do you agree or disagree with any of my predictions? Let’s talk about it in the comments, and make sure to follow me on social media!
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Physical Books

I don’t foresee any major change in this department. I think the printing of physical books has found a happy medium in terms of sales. There might be some spikes and some lows of people buying physical books, but it will more or less stay the same with maybe a small growth.

I find a lot of less serious readers prefer to have a physical book in their hands because they don’t see the need for an e-reader. A lot of book bloggers/tubers also seem to like getting their hands on physical books, though plenty like e-books too.


e-Books

I think the demand for e-books will continue to grow at a steady pace. It is becoming a much more affordable and portable way to read. If authors and publishers want to keep e-readers happy though, I think they will need to find ways to ensure more accessible files for their e-books, which brings me to my second point.

I think we will see more variety in types of e-readers. I think a few companies will develop their own version of a Kindle, with unique features specific to their brand, which will give readers cheaper options that might fit their needs/wants better. Two companies that I believe could pursue this path are Google and Microsoft, but also possibly an out of the blue small company that focuses solely on e-readers.


Audiobooks

Audiobooks will continue to grow and become more mainstream. Audiobook services will be easier to obtain for smaller authors, and audiobook narrators will be more sought after.

I think there will be more of a division between narrators though, with a small group of narrators being regularly sought after, and listeners will look for books by those specific narrators.

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Publishing

With the Black Lives Matter movement across the world, I expect to see better diversity in publishing. It’s not something that happens overnight, but I expect by 2025-7 we will see more equality between what peoples are being published. I expect there to be ups and downs, some being lower and higher based off of social upbringings, but for the most part we will see more equality.


Writing

I actually predict that writing will become less of a career path for many people. With the rise of technology and video games I think that young people won’t pursue writing as often since they won’t be reading as much.

What we will see a rise in is the number of non-white authors. I think as publishing better represents minorities, those minorities will see writing as a tangible career choice.


Adaptations

Already there are a lot of TV shows and movies that are based off of books and I think this will only continue to rise. The o only issue is that these companies too often re-make old content because they know it will make them money.

With more ideas coming from authors with a large variety of backgrounds, the entertainment industry will be forced to turn them into movies and TV shows.

I also think that books will start getting video game adaptations. I don’t see this becoming a regular habit until the late 2020s, but I think there is a lot of potential for really fun video-games that could become best-sellers if they are dated from books. Look at the Witcher Series for example.


Marketing

It’s tough to market books, there isn’t much you can do that would be new in my opinion. I think marketers will embrace certain styles of books, or books with certain voices and characters in them.


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Overall

I don’t see much of a change for the book world overall in the next 10 years except becoming more inclusive. We will see a change in stories and trends, but for the most part I don’t see things changing.

If I had to make one big guess, I would assume that the desire for YA content will be greater than ever. YA content is almost universally read so publishers will pursue it as a safe bet.


What are your predictions for the book world? Do you agree or disagree with any of my predictions? Let’s talk about it in the comments, and make sure to follow me on social media!
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My Oldest Books

Hello dear readers, you’re in for a treat today whether you like it or not, because today I am going to share the oldest books that I own!

Most of my books are from this century. Even if it was a book written before 2000, I probably have a modern version of it.

There are a few exceptions however, but before I show them to you, I’m going to tease you a bit more.

When I went to University, every few weeks there would be this man that would show up with hundreds of used books for sale.

He’d get these books at garage sales, other book stores, estate sales, or even from people who left their large collections to him in their will.

He had recent books, he had old books, he had books everyone has heard of, and he had books that you’ll never hear the name of again.

I probably spent way too much money on his books, at a time when I definitely couldn’t afford it, but I’m a sucker for a book sale.

I didn’t buy these two books together, but when I did buy them, my friend and I were having a competition to see who could find the older book.

My friend is currently winning, unfortunately, but I haven’t given up hope yet.

BUT

Without further adieu ladies and gentlefolk…here are my oldest books!

These two were only from the 1970s, but they’re on the older end of things for me.


1921 was a good year for Tennyson Poems, and I love the texture of the cover too!


And last, and definitely the oldest book in my collection…More Tennyson poems from 1893!


What’s your oldest book? I’d love to see it if you’re willing to share.
Show me in the comments or on social media.
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March Madness: Book Edition

Hello again dear readers, it’s a pleasure as always.

I am not sure how much of a sports fan you all consider yourselves, but there is a sports tournament in the U.S. every year that has inspired me to come up with this idea.

Basically the way it works, is that 64 college basketball teams play against each other in a March Madness tournament, until there is a champion.

Teams are ranked from 1st to 16th in one of four conferences, and they are paired up accordingly: 1v16, 2v15, 3v14, and so on.


As much as I love sports, I thought I would come up with a bit of a different idea for March Madness…and that is to do it with books!

I don’t have the entire list ready yet, but I am going to do some research over the next week and come up with 64 books, split into 4 different categories.

I won’t be deciding the winner of each match up…that will be left to you, my readers.

Each day in March I will post one or two of the matchups in a Twitter poll, and you can vote for your winner.

I will also be looking through social media to see if either of the books are being talked about. For each post I see about the two books facing off against each other, that will count as one vote.


Now I don’t have a large Blog, or Twitter following, so I am hoping my followers will be helping me out a little bit with this one and retweeting some of my Twitter Posts.

I am not entirely sure how well this will work, but I have my fingers crossed that it will go well. Depending on my research, I may reduce the number of books in the contest to 32 or 16, but we will cross that bridge when we come to it.


Anyways, thanks for any support you give me dear readers. It is all greatly appreciated and I hope you are as excited for this as I am.

If all goes well with it, I might have a contest with this idea for next year.

And as always, don’t forget to follow me on social media!
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Book Review: Viking: Odinn’s Child

Title: Viking: Odinn’s Child
Author: Tim Severin
Rating: 6/10


Happy Monday fellow readers. As always, Monday is book review day, and today I am taking a look at Viking: Odinn’s Child by Tim Severin.


In 1001, the young child, Thorgils Leiffson, son of Leif the Lucky and Thorgunna, arrives on the shores of Greenland to be brought up by a young woman—Gudrid. Thorgils is a rootless character of quicksilver intelligence and adaptability. He has inherited his mother’s ability of second sight, and his mentors teach him the ancient ways and warn him of the invasion of the “White Christ” into the land of the “Old Gods.” Guided by a restless quest for adventure and the wanderlust of his favored god, Odinn, Thorgils’ fortunes will take him into worlds of unimaginable danger and discovery.


Odinn’s Child was one of my first real experiences into the historical fiction genre and Viking culture as a whole.

I had been a fan of history and fantasy since I started reading, but most of the stories that I experienced and fell in love with up to this point were Ancient Mediterranean or the Middle Ages.

Knights. Dragons. Magical swords. Castles.

Demi-Gods, Ancient heroes. Magical Monsters.

These were the stories that wowed me as a young reader, because Vikings, Ancient Egypt, and dozens of other cultures weren’t brought to my attention as much.

Odinn’s child changed that though. It opened my eyes to what the Vikings were, and the Norse Mythology that came along with them.


Norse Mythology, bloody battles, and a brief glimpse into the world of 1000s Europe, Odinn’s child is the first volume in the Viking Trilogy and all 350 odd pages will leave you wanting more.

The story follows a young boy, Thorgils Leiffson, the son of Leif the Lucky and Thorgunna as he arrives in Greenland to be fostered by a young woman – Gudrid.

Thorgils is a quick witted, intelligent, and very adaptable character that has inherited his mother’s ability of second sight.

Thorgils, who is basically orphaned, is raised by various mentors during his time in Greenland. They teach him the ways to worship the Norse Gods, along with their ancient customs, and warn him of the ‘White Christ’ that is making its way into the land of the ‘Old Gods’

Thorgils has a sense of adventure and looks to Odinn as his favoured god. Death, battle, disease, execution, and shipwreck are just some of the adventures that await Thorgils in Odinn’s child.


Severin does a good job of giving readers a steady look into Thorgils progression from a boy to a man.

He learns from several mentors, about many different things, but it never seems rushed, despite being contained within 350 odd pages.

The look into the Viking culture and the spread of Christianity into their lifestyle is an interesting plot for the book.

It’s not the major plot-line, but it nicely compliments the story and helps drive it forward by introducing new conflicts and characters.


Historical fiction isn’t a genre that I have delved too deeply into, but I want to get into the genre. I still have my copy of Odinn’s child from when I read it as a young teenager, and I might read it again to re-experience a series I loved as a kid.

AudioBook Review: Outlander

I have said before that it is a rare occurrence for a TV show or movie to be better than the book, but Outlander is one of those books that might just be an exception.

I had binge watched most of the TV show in a few weeks, knowing that there was a related book series, but I didn’t really feel like I had the time to start another series of books since I already had a few going at the time.

I had a free audio book that I could download, and I figured Outlander would be a good choice of book, and I am happy I was right.

Despite being a fantastic book, that the TV show is very similar to, I think an audiobook was a good call for Outlander, because the woman who was reading the story had a nice accent, and did a good job changing her voice slightly depending on who was speaking.

This is one of the few audiobooks I have listened to, but each one I listen to makes me love the medium more and more.


In terms of how the book actually was, I thought it was well written, very descriptive, and historically accurate (from my small understanding of that period in history).

I think when doing a historical fiction piece, it is important to get some level of accuracy, and I think Diana Gabaldon did a great job of writing about the period and the characters.

I haven’t read too many historical fiction pieces before, but I thought that I could really understand the period and the society that Gabaldon writes about in Outlander.

I haven’t learned a lot of this period in history, but I have done some research after watching the TV show, and from what I can tell Outlander is pretty spot on to what I could have expected.


Gabaldon’s writing style has caused her to quickly cracked my Top 10 favourite authors even though I only listened to one of her books.

I find her descriptive writing to be captivating enough that I can see myself in the story, but not overbearing that it becomes a grind getting through different scenes.

I think there is a time and place for overly descriptive writing. I think George R.R. Martin does a good job of it, but he is one of the few people that I have read that was able to do it well.

Gabaldon’s writing has enough description in it that there were times I could see the scene so perfectly, and the sex scenes were…interesting to say the least.


I think a historical-fiction book does its’ job when it makes the reader want to explore more. After listening to the entire book on my walks to and from work every day, I watched a few other shows about Scotland and their history. I also did some light reading online about Scotland and their fights for independence.

As you probably know, I am a lover of history, and Outlander has definitely made me want to dive a little deeper into the historical fiction genre.


I plan on continuing the series in the future, but not any time soon. There’s a few other series I want to finish first, but I won’t forget Outlander because I really enjoy the TV show.

Top 5 Tuesday: Top 5 Books on My TBR

The usual Top 10 list that I get ideas from didn’t have a topic I was interested in writing this week, so I found a Top 5 idea from Yolanda at Past Midnight, who got the idea from Shanah at Bionic Book Worm, so thank both of you for the idea.

This weeks list is all about the books on my TBR that I am most excited to read. The TBR list on my blog isn’t the complete list, so expect a few that you wont find on there.

#1 The Road by Cormac McCarthy

I vaguely remember seeing the movie years ago, and I thought it was pretty good, so I thought maybe I would read the book. There’s no real reason this is on my TBR list other than I am excited to get away from the fantasy genre for a little bit.

#2 American Gods by Neil Gaiman

Neil Gaiman is a great author from my experience, and I have heard that American Gods is a terrific read. Plus, as a Supernatural fan, I am a big lover of the “gods walking among us” idea.

#3 IT by Stephen King

Though technically this is the book I am currently reading, I haven’t gotten too far into it yet, so I am counting it on my TBR list. So far it’s been a great read, and I can’t wait to dive into it further.

#4 Frankenstein by Mary Shelley

Of course one of the classics is on my list, especially Frankenstein. A few first hand accounts I have heard make me want to read this one as soon as possible.

#5 Top 10 Games You Can Play In Your Head by Yourself by D. F. Lovett, J. Theophrastus Bartholomew, and Sam Gorski

I actually found out about this book through a YouTube channel that I follow, and the idea sounds really interesting. It’s supposed to help your brain function, and I often find myself passing the time with meaningless tasks because I am bored.


Are any of these books on your TBR? If not, what books are you most excited to read? Let me know in the comment section.

Book Review: Tragedy in the Commons

The Canadian Federal Election is coming up in a few weeks, so I thought it would be a good idea to cover the one Political Science book that I have read.

I want to read more books about politics, but they’re usually on the back of my mind so I don’t often look for them when I go book shopping.

This one however was very insightful, and got me interested in the genre.

This really isn’t a book about one party’s politics, or a certain political viewpoint. This was more about how the Canadian political system works as a whole, and the different aspects of the system.

It’s written and includes stories about former Members of Parliament. It’s that first hand account that really drive the point home in my opinion.

It’s one thing to write about something you never really experienced. You can get all the facts, get the first hand accounts, but there is nothing quite like experiencing it for yourself.

I read this book while I was taking a Political Science class and it was a nice education in the field.

I had a basic understanding of how Canada’s democratic system worked, but I didn’t really understand the intricate workings of it until I read this book.

I wouldn’t call myself an expert in any shape or form, but this sort of made me realize how important it is to have an understanding of your country’s government.


I don’t know what country you are reading this in, but one of the best parts of a democracy is that you get a voice. Whether you like this person or that person, this ideal or that, this party or the other, you have a chance to vote.

It’s important to vote. I mean it is literally the fundamental component of the democratic system.

It’s only been a handful of elections, but I have voted in every single election I have had the chance to vote in because I have the right.

Many people across the world don’t have that chance, and so I take advantage of the opportunity when I can.

I won’t share my political views, that’s not the point of the post. The point is to understand how your government works. People will argue that they don’t vote for a handful of reasons, but I promise you they are all crap. There is no reason not to vote.


Overall Tragedy in the Commons is a good book. I was a bit worried because I thought it would be difficult to follow along, but it’s not.

It’s a really easy read, and any confusing concepts are explained in detail that you don’t need to be a political nut to understand it all.

I don’t think a lot of my readers are in Canada, so this book won’t really do much for you.

What I am hoping for then, is that you get some sort of inspiration from it. You feel some inner need to vote, even if you think it’s pointless or a waste of time, do it anyways. Especially you young folk. Let your voice be heard.