I’M BACK

I’M BACK

So you may have noticed that I’ve been gone from the blog for the past week and a half or so.

I’m not sure if you are worried, but if you were, don’t be because I am perfectly fine.

I am not sick, in danger, or uninterested in continuing the blog, I just wanted to take a break to see how I felt about it.

I wanted to see how my life would be if I took a step away from the blog and just didn’t touch it, or the Podcast for a bit.

The conclusion I came to?

It felt like part of me was missing. I know I had just started this blog a half year ago, but it’s become part of who I am.

It’s become a part of me that I missed for almost two weeks, and I am excited to get back going again.

The schedule will stick to what it was before, except I might do Top 10 for Tuesdays instead of doing the writing prompts that I usually do.

So if you were missing my daily content, you won’t be missing any longer because starting today there will be regular content coming at ya!

I’ve got a few good ideas planned for the next few months and I think you all will enjoy them.

It might not all pan out as I hope, but I’ve got one segment planned that I am really excited for, and I think people might enjoy it a lot too.

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Book Review: A Crown of Swords

I just finished up A Crown of Swords just last week, and since I am morally obligated to review any book I finish recently as soon as I can, here it is.

Every time I open up a Wheel of Time book, I get a bit nervous about what’s coming for me.

I mean there are 14 books in the series, some of them are bound to be a bit more dull than the others.

Game of Thrones suffered from some dull moments, and there are less than half the amount of Wheel of Time books. So far, I haven’t been disappointing. For the most part, Wheel of Time books have a lot of moments that are spectacular, and some that are dull, but necessary.

A Crown of Swords fit that description, but one thing I will give it, that I don’t remember happening to me in any of the previous books, was that the events in the book seemed to fly by.

I’ll probably do a bad job at explaining it, but when I was reading it, I would sometimes find myself chapters further in the book, and twenty minutes had gone by.

You know the old saying, Time flies when you’re having fun. That fit perfectly when I was reading this one, and I don’t think I had experienced it in any other Wheel of Time book.

I think what made the book fun for me was Mat. As of now he is my favourite character, and he was heavily prominent in this segment of the series. That, mixed with other character plots and setting up future events in the series really made me enjoy the book a lot more than I was hoping for.

But, as much as I liked A Crown of Swords, it was not perfect. In fact, there were some classic Robert Jordan moments in it that get on my nerves whenever they happen.

Jordan likes to have an overarching villain throughout the series, which is fine, and give him some Lieutenants that sort of do his dirty work while we wait to get to the main villain.

I don’t mind the concept. In fact I’d prefer it because we can sort of see the main characters grow and become stronger over time, defeating more and more bad guys.

A problem that Jordan has though, is that he will introduce some bad guys, fleshing them out three or four books before they become relevant again, and then in a snap of your fingers, the main characters win against him/her.

Nynaeve’s conflict against Mogedhien was completely relevant. We know there’s a grudge there, and we know that the two of them fighting in some way was going to happen.

Rand and Sammael had a conflict brewing, and we knew the fight between them would happen eventually, but to me it sort of seems their fight this book was rushed and unnecessary.

Rand is scheming all the time, and I understand that, but he literally wakes up from nearly dying a few days earlier, and instantly he brings some allies to go kill Sammael.

I know the battle needs to happen, but the second after he wakes up after being passed out for a few days, and against an opponent that I don’t think was mentioned more than once in the book previously.

Rand has a lot of wasted time in this book, so giving him a few chapters to better set up the conflict between himself and Sammael would have made a lot more sense.

And the battle itself ends in almost an instant. Rand shoots off some Baelfire, and BAM, fights over. Rand doesn’t even confirm that Sammael died, he just assumes that nobody could survive that attack and leaves it there.

As annoying as this was, I am excited for what Jordan did for Mat at the end of the book.

In his last chapter, Mat is searching Ebou Dar for Olver, as the city is being attacked by the Seanchan Empire. Mat basically gets thrown and crushed by rocks as they attack the city, and that’s where it stops.

I hope that the book continues from there, or not long after. I know in The Path of Daggers, he isn’t present because of his injuries in the attack, which was the same as Perrin earlier, but Mat’s storyline is one of my favourite ones in the books, so I am excited to see where he goes from his present situation.

overall, A Crown of Swords is a great book. I’d put it in the upper half of the Wheel of Time books I’ve read so far.

Manga Review: Naruto

Naruto was one of the first anime I ever got into, and was the first manga that I started reading. I enjoyed it way more than the anime, because it wasn’t filled with months upon months of filler episodes, it was just the main story.

I am still on the fence about my final rating for Naruto though.

The biggest reason I am not doing an arc review for Naruto like I am with One Piece, is because it has been a few years since Naruto finished, and so I don’t really think people would be interested in arc reviews.

I may do one of Boruto one day, but I’m not sure.

Naruto has its moments. One aspect that really made me enjoy the series was the overall story being told. The first half of Naruto was discovering his powers and abilities, and becoming a ninja, but it was still supplemented by the overall world building and character development that helped the series springboard into the second half…which is where the most important events take place.

Part of me wants to say Naruto was this amazing manga that had no issues in it because it was the first manga I started to read. I mean it does have a great story, in typical Shonen fashion. It has a great world building aspect to it as well, and we know that there is more to the world than just what we see on the pages.

There are villains we get to learn about, these great historical figures that shaped the world that are mentioned over and over, but aren’t really brought up, and there are is even great world building within the Leaf Village due to all of the other characters we know about.

It does have a lot of pros going for it. I think any manga reader that has read Naruto would agree with me there, but I think they’d also agree that there are plenty of flaws as well.

The main character Naruto is super annoying in the first half of the manga, and even in the second half his habit of sticking to his ideals and trying to convince his enemies he is right gets annoying, because it works time and time again.

Aside from the main character, the biggest issue I have with the manga is the characters and their power scaling. Some of the characters, mainly the females, are essentially useless throughout the entire series, but because they are considered main characters, they keep coming back over and over.

That is another issue. Basically every female in the series is useless when it comes to fighting. There are some that are extremely powerful, and they’re usually pretty interesting characters, but for the most part it’s just the guys that are doing all the work and I’m not okay with that.

There are several female characters we know of that are very powerful, more powerful than some males, but they get less time. It is also a surprise that this is the case because you’d think guys, who are the main audience for the manga, would want to see women more often.

The power scaling is also annoying, like I mentioned. I won’t dive into it too much because I could talk about it for hours, and I understand it’s not a perfect system, but all I am going to say is that there are several times where a character goes from being wayyyyy too weak to becoming an overpowered bad ass master of some ability in basically an instant.

It becomes an issue when characters do it two or three times in basically a week…Naruto.

So yeah…like I said I am conflicted on how I would rank it. It’s good. I definitely recommend the read, but I don’t want to say it’s the perfect manga ever, because it’s not, by a long shot…

Book Review: Legend by Marie Lu

I remember reading this book years ago in highschool as the first book in the book club I had just joined.

We got to pick books out of a crate and I was one of the last ones to pick, and the cover of Legend looked interesting.

I started reading it on the bus ride home that afternoon and I was done by the end of the week.

I was hooked in an instant. It was an easy YA book to read, and it was the first book that I read that had a dystopian theme to it. I was putting my foot in the water with Legend, and quickly dove right in because I loved it so much.

One thing I really enjoyed about Legend was jumping between two different perspectives. Marie Lu wrote her entire trilogy about Day and June, two “perfect” characters, or so their tests and evaluations tell us, who have two different experiences in life.

June is hunting down Day, whom she believed killed her brother, and we get to see their interactions from both perspectives.

Usually having different perspectives in the same book isn’t much of a big deal because plenty of books do it.

That is true, but most of them have different character perspectives because they are focusing on different parts of the world, and having just one person’s perspective wouldn’t give readers a large enough scope of what is happening.

In Legend, and the other two books in the series, Day and June spend a lot of time together.

Day is from the poorer part of society, and we get to experience his life as a rebel, helping out the poor much like a Robin Hood sort of figure. He pulls off some pretty insane stunts and is a genius in his own regard, he just does things on his own.

June on the other hand, works for the “government”. She is top of her class, and like June, is able to perform some very remarkable physical stunts and is also a genius in her own regard. She is also fairly well off in life, and hasn’t known poverty.

The two different perspectives in the books is a nice change. It gives us the poor and the rich side to everything. When one character is living their everyday life, the other is exploring it for the first time, and as a reader, this style of reading was nice, because it’s different.

June knows her truth of certain events that happen in the book, and Day knows his truth. Jumping between perspectives gives us a look at the inner thoughts of both characters when the time is right, but also puts us outside of their mind and their thoughts when the stroy needs it to happen.

Marie Lu has done a wonderful job utilizing the different perspectives and making the two characters bounce off of eachother nicely.

Like I said, it is a fairly easy read, but it is good. If you like dystopian style books mixed with some spy and mystery novel aspects I recommend Legend.

Quote of the Day: May 17

Quote of the Day: May 17

“The only thing worse than a boy who hates you: a boy that loves you.” 
― Markus Zusak, The Book Thief

“I have hated words and I have loved them, and I hope I have made them right.” 
― Markus Zusak, The Book Thief

“Like most misery, it started with apparent happiness.” 
― Markus Zusak, The Book Thief

Wednesday News: May 15 2019

Wednesday News: May 15 2019

Do you give writing advice to people?

Do you take writing advice to other?

Has it helped you before? Or does it all get mixed in with the endless information and tips that will “make you a better writer”.

Maybe getting writing advice isn’t the way to go. Maybe you just need to solve the problem for yourself, and figure out what works and what doesn’t work for you.

Either way, you should definitely read this article by Guy Gavriel Kay. He discusses getting writing advice, and how it may not be all it’s worked out to be.

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