Wheel of Time Wednesdays: Script Read Through.

Wheel of Time Wednesdays: Script Read Through.

A few weeks ago the cast of the upcoming Wheel of Time TV show did a read through of the script.

Today, a short video was released.

Hope you enjoy!

Advertisements

Type It Out Tuesday: May 7

Type It Out Tuesday: May 7

Couldn’t find any writing prompts that I liked this week, but I have a few six-word stories I think you’ll enjoy. Let me know what you think in the comments.

I hope you all enjoy them. I really love six-word stories because they usually bring a huge story to my head in such a short amount of time.

Painfully, he changed “is” to “was.”

We’re lying in bed. She’s lying.

“Total media blackout,” agreed the President.

BREAKING: Simulated beings realize they’re simulated.

“Joining the President is his husband…”

Dot in the sky. Dead pixel.

“Wrong number,” says a familiar voice.

Book Review: A Knight of the Seven Kingdoms

A century before A GAME OF THRONES, two unlikely heroes wandered Westeros…

Rating: ★★★★☆

Author: George R.R. Martin

Continueing with the Game of Thrones theme that has been so popular lately, for whatever reason, this week I decided I’d review A Knight of the Seven Kingdoms, a prequel “series” to the main storyline.

18635622.jpg

Having read the main series before I got a hold of this, I had a basic understanding of some of the characters in the book.

What I really enjoy about the supplementary Game of Thrones books is that there is usually some really nice artwork to look at while you read. There is some artwork in this one, but not as much as I would prefer, and msot of it is sketches.

I read it probably three years ago now, and I still remember some of the moments in the book because of how cool they are. I remember tjere was one about Duncan, or Dunc, who is the main character of the book, and he is tried for a crime, which causes a trial by combat.

After the combat, which his team had one, multiple royal family members and Kingsguard members were left dead, all because they defended the innocence of some random guy, who was really a sorry excuse for a knight. His main feature was just finding Egg, and guiding him around the world and keeping him out of trouble.

Dunc and Egg make a wonderful pair, and become life-long friends because of the events in this book. Ser Duncan is not only a knight in name, but also one in deed. This is something increasingly rare in the seven kingdoms. There are few true knights and even fewer when the events of A Song of Ice and Fire take place.

tumblr_nvsbbpk8Ev1u2n5cyo1_500.png

Dunc is a strong and honorable knight, but isn’t all that smart. They call him “thick as a castle wall,” but that’s where Egg comes into play.

Egg is still a boy, though he has a fully developed mind that even the Maesters shall envy. He tempers Ser Duncan’s wrath, guiding him to choose the best course of action. Indeed he has the mind that Duncan lacks. However, for all his intelligence, he still has a whole world to see and understand; he still needs to develop his wisdom.

By being Duncan’s squire, he gets to see honour and decency; he begins to understand how people work, and how best to defeat them; he learns that it can be achieved through words as well as deeds.

The two embark on some interesting adventures. Their first (The Hedge Knight ) is by far my favourite. It depicts the pair’s first meeting, and they discover how important them coming together was. Dunc changes the fate of the Seven Kingdoms. The two only met by chance. Their actions lead to the altercation of who is to be the next King. So, it’s all rather far reaching stuff. The second story ( The Sworn Sword) didn’t quite work for me and felt a little flat in all. The third ( The Mystery Knight) made up for it, though, with its character defining moments.

image.jpeg

Overall they are all a short read, but nontheless are fun to read, and if you are a Game of Thrones fan, they are a necessity.

Book Review: Steelheart

Rating: 4/5

Author: Brandon Sanderson

There are no heroes.

Every single person who manifested powers—we call them Epics—turned out to be evil.

Here, in the city once known as Chicago, an extraordinarily powerful Epic declared himself Emperor. Steelheart has the strength of ten men and can control the elements. It is said no bullet can harm him, no sword can split his skin, no explosion can burn him. He is invincible.

It has been ten years. We live our lives as best we can. Nobody fights back . . . nobody but the Reckoners. A shadowy group of ordinary humans who spend their lives studying powerful Epics, finding their weaknesses, then assassinating them.

My name is David Charleston. I’m not one of the Reckoners, but I intend to join them. I have something they need. Something precious, something incredible. Not an object, but an experience. I know his secret.

I’ve seen Steelheart bleed.

steelheart_by_newburgart_d6dhes8-pre.jpg

So as I started writing this, I was having a serious case of deja vu. I could have sworn that I had already done a review on this one, but couldn’t find it for the life of me.

Maybe I am losing my mind, or maybe the stress of school, life, and everything else has finally gotten to me.

If, for some reason, someone can find a review I did for Steelheart, please let me know and I’ll throw together another review, but I am pretty sure I haven’t done one yet.

Anyways…

I really enjoyed Steelheart. It was fun, fast-paced, and fantastic. I can’t remember a single moment of the book where I was bored or uninterested in what was going on.

Steelheart has a very interesting concept that touches on a lot of different genres of books.

Basically you start with a dystopian world, mix in a bit of superhero powers, a pinch of spy novels, add a dash of mystery/detective novels, top it off with a drop of humour, mix them all together in a 386 page hardcover book and you’ve got Steelheart.

It’s a really simple book, but Brandon Sanderson does a good job at not wasting any time and telling the story that needs to be told.

The aspect of the book that I enjoyed the most is the man vs. superhero story that is the main aspect of the book.

I’ll try not to ruin anything, but there may be a spoiler warning in effect from here on out.

The general concept of the book is as follows; one day people all over the world realized they had these superpowers, so they became known as Epics. The ended up basically taking over the world, and ruled it as they saw fit. The biggest thing people came to realize for the Epics though, is they all have one weakness, no matter how powerful they are, there is something that can beat them, even if it is completely bizarre.

7fe37e9eea44cacd481b39ab37957bd0_original.png

This isn’t in the books, but what the weaknesses are is something like this. Say I was a super fast Epic, with the ability to run faster than Flash. My weakness could be something completely unrelated, like tacos. If someone threw a taco at me, or possibly even put it where I could see it, my power would become useless and I’d basically be human again.

The heroes in the books, The Reckoners, are all humans without powers, and they fight against the oppressive Epics to try and give people a shot at a decent life.

They need to rely on a lot of planning and strategy to get the job done, because they don’t have unbreakable skin, flight, mind-reading, or any other cool powers to work with. The use of strategy in the books is a really cool and fun to read part to read because not a lot of books will give you the nitty gritty of people’s plans.

Now I’m sure you’ve been asked a million times before, if you could choose any superpower to have, what would it be…well I wanna know in the comments below. 

What would mine be you ask? I think it would be mind reading or mind control. Haven’t decided quite yet. 

Anyways, thanks for reading the Steelheart book review, I hope you enjoyed it. 

Next week I’ll go where no book blogger has gone before, and review a book about a boy who was scarred, almost from birth, by a man he has a strong connection to.

Weekly Recap

In case you happened to miss one of my posts this week here they are:

Manga Review: Bleach

Type it Out Tuesdays

Wednesday News: January 23

Top 5 Manga/Anime Characters

Quote of the Day: January 25

As always I hope you guys enjoy.

Manga Review: Bleach

Rating:2.5/5

Author: Tite Kubo

I’m a big supporter of mangas, and I honestly prefer them over comic books myself.

The biggest determining factor as to whether or not I will read a manga is the art style. If the first 5 chapters have an art style that I don’t like, I quit reading (I give it 5 chapters to see if it grows on me). If I like the art style, I keep reading, usually until the end or until I catch up to the publications.

Bleach was a manga that I had actually first started as an anime, but was interested enough to go explore the manga instead.

Overall, I wasn’t thoroughly impressed with Bleach.

Yeah it had cool fight scenes, and some of the Shinigami had AWESOME weapons, Shikai and Bankai (if you don’t know what those are then time to read the manga!).

Bleach-manga.jpg

I was even okay with the newcomer and main character being a total bad ass (for a while at least).

What really bothered me about Bleach was 3 things.

I.) The main character (Ichigo) was constantly using main characteritis to do more and more ridiculous things.

I’m okay with the main character being weirdly strong right off the hop, as long as it makes some sort of sense, but when the main character is one of the strongest Shinigami at the time, after only a few weeks of being one, meanwhile some of the people he beats have been for years; or even decades, is something I can’t get over.

Ichigo_kurosaki_color_by_ramaru9-d693gy8.png

II.) The fact that there was no real idea of bigger and badder enemies in each arc, it felt more like INSERT AUTHOR kept pulling out more and more ridiculous stories just to make some sense.

A manga like Naruto has different villains every arc, but there is an overall villain that is mentioned pretty early on, even if we don’t know much about them when they are first introduced. I think this approach goes a longer way to keeping readers interested in the manga, and enjoying the mystery behind it too.

III.) Bleach suffers from the terrible, “rushing to finish the story so we are gonna make it really bad and have a lot of unhappy readers” disease. 

Not a lot of the mangas I have read suffer from this disease, but when they have a case of it, it’s really bad. I’m not saying the Bleach manga ending is bad, actually I think the opposite. I really enjoyed the ending, I just didn’t enjoy how fast it went.

Again I’m gonna stress this, probably not for the last time, THE END IS JUST AS IMPORTANT, IF NOT MORE IMPORTANT, THAN THE START OF THE BOOK.

Yes, the start of the book is what hooks readers in, and yes the beginning of a book is the first impression a person gets from the book, but in my opinion, the last impression is more important.

When I put down a book for the last time, it’s not after reading the first pages of it, it’s after reading the last pages of the book. If the end of the book is rushed and doesn’t fit the rest of the story, readers are not likely to have fond memories or the book.

Next week I’m gonna take a look at a book mentioned by Professor X in the original X-Men trilogy (I believe the second one).

Did you enjoy Bleach? Why or why not? Let’s talk about it in the comments. 

 

Weekly Recap

In case you missed any of this week’s posts, here they are:

Book Review: History’s Worst Inventions

Type it Out Tuesday: January 15

Wednesday News: January 16

What does my library look like?

Quote of the Day: January 18

%d bloggers like this: