Supernatural Season 7 Review

Supernatural Season 7 Review

Season 7 of Supernatural is very polarizing from what I can tell. Reading comments and blogs online shows that the Leviathans are a it or miss addition to the show.

Some people dislike them, and believe Season 7 is sort of a waste because they really aren’t that good of an enemy to the Winchesters, and the overall season isn’t very well written.

I don’t disagree with that statement. It’s not the best season overall. There are a lot of deus ex machina situations, and it feels like the writers for this season were trying to hang on to the past.

Personally, I like the idea of the Leviathans. They were an overwhelming enemy that really didn’t have a way to be permanently defeated, but they were sort of left in the dust.

The brothers ended up defeating Dick Roman, the Leviathan head honcho, and a few others along the way, but Dick was the only one they actually killed.

I would have liked the Leviathans to be more of a long-term enemy like Angels and Demons are. They are both enemies at different times throughout the series, and allies at other times too.

Leviathans could defeat both Angels and Demons, and were honestly better in mostly every aspect, other than they were temporary.

Now technically there are some Leviathans still out there, so we may see a revival of them in the upcoming final season, but I doubt that is the case.

Overall? The season could be better.

There weren’t a lot of interesting side hunts this season, and the ones that we did get pointed to the Leviathan a decent amount of the time.

Do I dislike the season? Not at all. I think it had a good amount of storytelling, and we got a lot of emotions from the brothers when dealing with Bobby, who turns into a ghost this season.

In my opinion, some of the strongest parts of the show aren’t when the brothers end up killing some monster or stopping some world-ending threat. I think some of the strongest moments are when the brothers show their vulnerable side, opening up about how scared they are, or how they doubt themselves, because it makes them more human. It makes them more relatable.

The one part of this season that I disliked the most though was the side characters. Two more specifically. We get introduced to Frank, who is a conspiracy nut and a computer wizard, and he helps the brothers out when they need to get off the grid.

He’s around for a bit, but then suddenly disappears from the show and we don’t get mention of him again. He’s assumed to be dead and eaten by the Leviathan, but the Winchesters don’t say much about it and Frank gets lost in the grand scheme of 14 seasons.

The other is Kevin Tran. Now Kevin becomes a very important character in future seasons, which I am totally fine with. He adds a nice touch to the show and he becomes a member of the Winchester’s proxy family. What I don’e like about him this season is his introduction.

He comes into the show with only a couple of episodes left, and he becomes this necessary piece to stopping the Leviathan.

If he had been introduced even halfway through the show I wouldn’t be upset about it, but I am not a fan of characters being introduced near the end of a season, just for them to be a key piece in stopping whatever world-ending threat is out there.

IF the character had been built up to, or the Winchesters had been on the hunt for them for a while, or even if there was some mention of it, then I am much more okay with this character’s late introduction.

My problem comes from when these characters appear literally out of the blue to save the day. To me that’s just lazy story telling.

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Supernatural Season 4

Supernatural Season 4

I apologize now for the late review of Season 4. I opened up my laptop yesterday, that was plugged in all night, and found it dead and not charging.

Eventually I went to Apple and bought a new cord, but that didn’t really fit into my schedule so I had to forgo posting yesterday unfortunately.

Season 4 sees Supernatural coming to an end of what was the original intended length, and the story clearly points to it.

Dean unknowingly broke open the first of 66 seals, and the boys and their new angel “allies” are working to prevent the other 65 from breaking and releasing Lucifer.

The brothers let some seals break and stop some from breaking. They work with these angels to stop the demons, but slowly we learn that more and more seals are being broken.

Dean is told that he will be the one to stop all of this, but Sam is the one that is actively working on his demon powers to get strong enough to stop Lilith, to the chagrin of all his allies and loved ones.

We get to meet Castiel for the first time this season (FINALLY!) and we also get Chuck near the end of it.

Overall the season is pretty good. I still prefer Season 3, but I would rank this one above Season 1 and 2.

This season was back to it’s full length of 22 ish episodes, and we get a nice variety again between main story enemies and random ones along the way.

Even some of the ones we thought were random turned out to be related to the overall story.

If you’re a fan of folklore and history like I am though, this show never seems to disappoint in terms of teaching you something. It’s fascinating to see the different culture’s ghosts and ghouls be brought to light in a more modern setting.

There are two interesting ideas that kept coming to mind whenever I would see Sam using his powers and Dean not liking a moment of it.

Family, and Responsibility.


Let’s get into the what I mean by responsibility.

Now Sam is a hunter, and we learn he has some pretty extraordinary powers–he is immune to the demon push thing and he can kill/exercise demons with his mind. Pretty sweet when your big enemy is a demon and they can’t touch you.

Unfortunately, Sam needs to drink demon blood to get stronger, and it slowly gets him addicted to it, and at the beck and call to Ruby.

I kept thinking back to the classic Spider-Man line: “With great power comes great responsibility,” and how it related to Sam.

Sam could defeat Lilith and potentially stop the war, but does he have to? Should he sacrifice his sanity and potentially his life just because he is maybe the only thing that could stop Lilith?

It would be possible to stop her without Sam’s powers. It wouldn’t be easy but it would be possible. Should Sam sacrifice himself for the greater good? It’s a problem heroes face all the time in storytelling.

Thinking logically, what if there was a bigger threat than Lilith and Sam could stop that one too. He could stop the enemy that would cause the more damage. But what if he sacrificed himself for Lilith instead, making him never able to sacrifice himself for what came next.

What do you think? Is Sam responsible to sacrifice himself for the threat at hand?


I also wanted to talk about what the word “family” means for a bit.

Sam and Dean are obviously blood brothers, and they feel responsible for each other’s actions.

Family is a big theme in Season 4, because Dean sees Sam slowly slip into darkness the more demon blood he consumes.

Eventually Dean can no longer handle it, and tries to give up on Sam. He tries to forget his responsibility to Sam because to him, Sam is hopeless. Sam can’t be saved any more.

But we all know Dean, and after a great line from Bobby “You think family is supposed to make you warm and happy? That’s why they’re family. They’re supposed to make you miserable,” Dean caves and reaches out to Sam.

Now to the question I wanted to ask.

Can and should you give up on family?

I know everyone will have a different idea on the matter, but I think its a worthwhile debate. Assume you’ve done all you can for your family. You’ve helped them out of scrape after scrape, yet they keep doing whatever they think is best, even though it’s so clearly wrong.

Dean gave up on his brother for a moment, and I’m sure he hates himself for it and won’t forget it till the day he dies, but that’s who Dean is.


I hope everyone enjoyed the review. Look out for Season 5, hopefully next Saturday because there won’t be any issues that come up (fingers crossed).

TV Review: Supernatural Season 1

TV Review: Supernatural Season 1

Usually my Saturday posts consist of a review of some movie. Today I decided I would mix it up a little bit. There are a few movies that I could review, for example Hobbs & Shaw. I saw it last night and overall, it wasn’t that bad.

Today however, I wanted to talk about one of my favourite TV shows that is coming to an end this year. That’s right…Supernatural is finally coming to an end after its 15th season on air.

I started following the show during its 10th season, and it took me about a month to watch seasons 1-9 to catch up to what was on air.

I decided to give each season its own review because this will be my one and only chance to really talk about the show.

Each Saturday will get its own season review. The final season will air on television before I get to finish all of the reviews, but I’ll also be throwing a predictions post when it is closer to the air date of the show.

Without further adieu ladies and gentlemen, my first of many Supernatural season reviews.

Season 1 of the show is a little rough, I’m not going to lie. That doesn’t make it a bad thing though, cause who expects pure gold from a TV show in its first season?

We get introduced to Sam and Dean, the two Winchester brothers and the main characters of the show, and we follow them along their path to find their dad who has been missing on a hunting trip.

Not a regular hunting trip though, more like a supernatural creature hunting trip.

Yep, we find out that Sam and Dean and their dad hunt those things that go bump in the night.

We get introduced to wendigos, demons, and dozens of other creepy and crawly things.

What do I like the most about this first season though? The fact that it’s basically just another CSI or other Detective type TV show, this one just has a twist to it.

I’ve always kind of wondered if this show would be as succesful as it was if it started this year, and I’m not really sure.

I know it’s not the best season of television to ever air, but I think it’s got a unique enough spin to it that I think it would do okay. At least from what I know, there are no other shows quite like Supernatural, where we have two brothers driving across the country hunting down ghosts and ghouls.

The first season helps build up the limitless potential though. Since we are introduced to a bunch of different creatures, we know that there are countless other things we can be introduced to along the way. We get monsters from different countries, cultures, religions and beliefs, and Season 1 does a good job of showing us these monster.

I have to tip my hat to the writers and researchers for this show though, because some of my favourite episodes are the ones that feature common myths or urban legends like Bloody Mary. I think its the subtle connections to things I am familiar with that helps cement Supernatural as one of my favourite shows.

One thing that Season 1 has a bit of a hard time doing though is setting up the tone of the show. This is the first season, so it’s not going to live or die by all the rules set in these episodes, but it does play a pretty big part in what comes after. Some episodes are funny, some scary, Some are action packed and some are more light hearted, while others overly dramatic.

It’s not a bad thing, and having watched the rest of the show I think Supernatural sort of blends them all together in a nice way, showing audiences it can do a bit of everything, but in the first season its just tough to get a proper feeling for what the show will be.

Luckily for the first season, they figured out the brotherly banter between Sam and Dean and showed it perfectly.

Brothers fight, brothers argue, and brothers get along. If you have a sibling you now how it is. One minute you want to knock them over the head with a chair, and the next minute you are best friends.

The two of them fit this dynamic perfectly, which grows in strength and interest as the series continues.

This plays nicely into the overall season arc, with the brothers hunting the demon that killed their Mother. Being joined by their hunter Dad, who is teased well throughout the series and plays a shadowy figure to the regular characters, the series begins to find direction and has a decent enough finale. The cliffhanger is slightly poor but there is enough interest to keep you watching.

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