2001: A Space Odyssey Movie Review

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Title: 2001: A SPace Odyssey
Director: Stanley Kubrick
Rating: ★☆☆☆☆

Hello sci-fi lovers, I hope I don’t ruin your day today. Since I reviewed the book of this movie earlier this week, I thought it would make sense to review the movie.

Well…I regret this decision 100%

To sum up this entire review in one sentence, this movie was BORING!

I read the book, very recently, so I know what happens pretty much every minute. I know the story that should appear on screen, I know how exciting it could be.

The problem is that there is too much happening, but at the same time, nothing happens.

Shots linger far too long. There’s probably half the movie that could be cut out because a shot that should be 10-15 seconds lingers for two minutes. It’s not even done for cinematic purpose, no cool acting moments, nothing. They’re just boring shots that hang for far too long.

Keir Dullea in a scene from the film ‘2001: A Space Odyssey’, 1968. (Photo by Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer/Getty Images)

The story itself was fine. It followed the book as well as it could, and didn’t skip the good stuff.

I think the story in general is lacking. I wanted more of a struggle with HAL, I wanted there to be tension, but there wasn’t.

I’ve found out there are other Space Odyssey books, so maybe there is more depth to the storyline.

The acting wasn’t amazing, but I’ll allow it because it is more than 50 years old.


I tried imagining that the reason the movie is so boring is because it was made so long ago, but I don’t think thats the case.

I just think that there wasn’t enough of a story to be adapted to a feature length film, and Kubrik wanted to show off the “cool new space movie” to people by prolonging shots.

I wish I could have experienced it back in the day, with a fresh perspective, but I don’t get that luxury.

Maybe it was the visual marvel I imagine it to be, or maybe not. It’s hard to say.

What I can say is that I was disappointed with the movie.


What did you think of 2001: A Space Odyssey? Maybe I am just the outlier that hates the movie. Let’s talk about it in the comments or on the social media the kids love these days.
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Quote of the Day: 2001: A Space Odyssey

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“Behind every man now alive stand thirty ghosts, for that is the ratio by which the dead outnumber the living. Since the dawn of time, roughly a hundred billion human beings have walked the planet Earth.

Now this is an interesting number, for by a curious coincidence there are approximately a hundred billion stars in our local universe, the Milky Way. So for every man who has ever lived, in this Universe there shines a star.

But every one of those stars is a sun, often far more brilliant and glorious than the small, nearby star we call the Sun. And many–perhaps most–of those alien suns have planets circling them. So almost certainly there is enough land in the sky to give every member of the human species, back to the first ape-man, his own private, world-sized heaven–or hell.

How many of those potential heavens and hells are now inhabited, and by what manner of creatures, we have no way of guessing; the very nearest is a million times farther away than Mars or Venus, those still remote goals of the next generation. But the barriers of distance are crumbling; one day we shall meet our equals, or our masters, among the stars.

Men have been slow to face this prospect; some still hope that it may never become reality. Increasing numbers, however are asking; ‘Why have such meetings not occurred already, since we ourselves are about to venture into space?’

Why not, indeed? Here is one possible answer to that very reasonable question. But please remember: this is only a work of fiction.

The truth, as always, will be far stranger.”
― Arthur C. Clarke, 2001: A Space Odyssey


“It was the mark of a barbarian to destroy something one could not understand.”
― Arthur C. Clarke, 2001: A Space Odyssey


“The more wonderful the means of communication, the more trivial, tawdry, or depressing its contents seemed to be.”
― Arthur C. Clarke, 2001: A Space Odyssey


“Open the pod bay doors, Hal.”
― Arthur C. Clarke, 2001: A Space Odyssey


“But he knew well enough that any man in the right circumstances could be dehumanised by panic.”
― Arthur C. Clarke, 2001: A Space Odyssey


“The time was fast approaching when Earth, like all mothers, must say farewell to her children.”
― Arthur C. Clarke, 2001: A Space Odyssey


“Now times had changed, and the inherited wisdom of the past had become folly.”
― Arthur C. Clarke, 2001: A Space Odyssey


“Unlike the animals, who knew only the present, Man had acquired a past; and he was beginning to grope toward a future.”
― Arthur C. Clarke, 2001: A Space Odyssey


“He was only aware of the conflict that was slowly destroying his integrity—the conflict between truth, and concealment of truth.”
― Arthur C. Clarke, 2001: A Space Odyssey


“Now, before you make a movie, you have to have a script, and before you have a script, you have to have a story; though some avant-garde directors have tried to dispense with the latter item, you’ll find their work only at art theaters.”
― Arthur C. Clarke, 2001: A Space Odyssey


“I’m a scientific expert; that means I know nothing about absolutely everything.”
― Arthur C. Clarke, 2001: A Space Odyssey


Yet there was no violation of the laws of mechanics; Nature always balances her books, and Jupiter had lost exactly as much momentum as Discovery had gained. The planet had been slowed down – but as its mass was a sextillion times greater than the ship’s, the change in its orbit was far too small to be detectable. The time had not yet come when Man could leave his mark upon the Solar System.”
― Arthur C. Clarke, 2001: A Space Odyssey


“Turing had pointed out that, if one could carry out a prolonged conversation with a machine—whether by typewriter or microphones was immaterial—without being able to distinguish between its replies and those that a man might give, then the machine was thinking, by any sensible definition of the word. Hal could pass the Turing test with ease. The”
― Arthur C. Clarke, 2001: A Space Odyssey


“Though the man-apes often fought and wrestled one another, their disputes very seldom resulted in serious injuries. Having no claws or fighting canine teeth, and being well protected by hair, they could not inflict much harm on one another. In any event, they had little surplus energy for such unproductive behavior; snarling and threatening was a much more efficient way of asserting their points of view.”
― Arthur C. Clarke, 2001: A Space Odyssey


When Your Computer Has A Mind of Its Own

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Title: 2001: A Space Odyssey
Rating: ★★★★☆
Author: Arthur C. Clark

I got through 2001: A Space Odyssey pretty quick, and it was never boring. I was actually surprised at what happened at a few times in the book.

When a book has “Space” and “Odyssey” in the title, you probably assume laser gun fights, space ships blasting off into space, and alien life forms with five eyes and four legs.

Now this book has a space ship, it has alien life forms, but does not have laser gun fights.

But, the book actually starts with a bunch of cavemen, and it was honestly some of the best writing I have ever read.

The simplicity in the cavemen’s thoughts and actions and their interactions with the alien life forms.


When we do finally get into the “modern” story line, I love that we get to see the advanced society that humans are living in, in a time that is before our time.

The story takes place in the early 2000s, and they have a more advanced society than we do in some ways, but in others it is similar.

We follow two astronauts in their trip into deep space with their trust AI computer to help them.

You can imagine what happens…the computer rises up and tries to take control of the ship.

This part of the book is the only reason I didn’t give it a five-star rating. I wanted more of a build up of tension. I wanted there to be more of a conflict between man and machine…but instead it was over just as quickly as it started.

Keir Dullea in a scene from the film ‘2001: A Space Odyssey’, 1968. (Photo by Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer/Getty Images)

We don’t get the build up, the conflict, and the resolution that I was hoping for. It’s not that the writing is bad. I was captivated through the entire book, it just didn’t seem quite complete.

The end of the story was interesting, and though I think it lead the story in an interesting direction, it really split it up into three very distinct parts.

Theres a beauty to a short story. It tells you an entire story, but it leaves you wanting more. It leaves you incomplete, but yet complete at the same time.

2001: A Space Odyssey has a similar feel to it, but I’d say its a step below. To put it in simple terms, a good short story tells ~50% of a story, and leaves the rest to your imagination. This book would more accurately be ~75% of a story. It tells you a lot, but it’s not quite in either category.


What did you think of 2001: A Space Odyssey? Let’s chat in the comments. Look for a review of the movie this weekend.
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Top 10 Books On My TBR That I Am Avoiding

Top Ten Tuesday was created by The Broke and the Bookish in June of 2010 and was moved to That Artsy Reader Girl in January of 2018. It was born of a love of lists, a love of books, and a desire to bring bookish friends together.

The Once and Future King

This one has been read twice, but I’ve only ever made it halfway through. It’s a good book, but I want to read it consistently, not once every few months.

Les Miserables

If you own this book you know how daunting it is. Its basically a brick, put inside of a cinder block. Maybe when I’m 70 I’ll take my first shot at it.

Wizards First Rule

The first book of a giant fantasy series. As exciting as that sounds I can’t afford to buy the rest, and if I read and enjoy the first one I don’t know if I’ll be able to stop myself.

Strategy

I bought this book because it looked really interesting, but much like Les Miserables, it seems too daunting a task to take on right now.

IT

I actually planned on waiting till the second IT movie came out before I read this for the first time. I really enjoyed the movie so I thought I’d enjoy the movies first and see how different the book was after.

2001 A Space Odyssey

No real reason, just haven’t been in the mood for this one yet. I guess a part of me doesn’t want to be dissapointed by a classic.

Life of Pi

The movie was really good, but I remember the book was a bit tough to get through honestly. It’s been a few years since I tried so I’ll give it another shot soon.

Cloud Atlas

I had to read this book for school one year, but being the good student that I am, I used Spark Notes. Always wanted to get another shot at it, but I haven’t built up the willpower yet.

Collective Work of Sherlock Holmes

Sherlock Holmes is cool as hell, but I’m not sure I can read dozens of works all together. I’ve been thinking about reading a story at a time, whenever I have free time. Sort of deal with it in chunks.

Assassin’s Creed Series

I loved the video games, and have a few of the books, but I don’t really want to read these honestly. I mean I’ve played the games so I don’t really need to read the books…but I’ll probably cave and read them eventually.