Movie Review: Ready Player One

Hello dear movie lovers, welcome to a Movie Review of Ready Player One. The book was written by Ernest Cline in 2011, and released in 2018 as a movie.

After the death of James Halliday, the creator of the virtual reality world, his pre-recorded message reveals the hidden fortune, which makes Wade Watts, a teenager, embark on a quest.

An action, adventure Sci-fi movie is something I will usually want to watch, and Ready Player One was on my list for a while.

I heard good things about it after it came out, but I kept pushing it back because I was never in the mood for it.

Well past me, I am blaming you for missing out on this movie, because it was truly something amazing.

At first, it was a movie I threw on in the background, but it didn’t take long at all before I was hooked.

The story: above average.
The nostalgia: awesome.
The Special Effects: jaw dropping.

Ready Player One’s story isn’t something new or overly interesting. We see the hero and his allies going on a journey to find the ultimate treasure.

We’ve seen the story before, and we will see it again and again. It’s not a bad story at all, but its not ground breaking.

Wade Watts dives into the Oasis to find the treasure left behind by a tech mogul. The treasure in question: shares equalling half a trillion dollars and complete control over the virtual reality world the Oasis.

It was an interesting enough story to keep me hooked, and I think that was all the movie needed; a simple story that is easy enough to follow.

Now let’s get to the nostalgia, because that was on a whole new level.

Some of it went over my head, because I was only a small kid when the movies would have come out, or I don’t get the same feeling of nostalgia as others when The Shining is referenced.

There was still plenty of references that I did understand, and many that were made about modern geek interests like Overwatch and Halo.

It was cool seeing childhood interests in a modern sci-fi movie being used in different ways. Whether it was the Delorean from Back to the Future, the Iron Giant, or even something simple like a Rubik’s cube.

Those were some of the more obvious call backs, but there were plenty of frames in the movie where you could pause it and see a half-dozen different “geek culture” references.

I’m sure someone has gone through the movie frame by frame to see all the nostalgic references, and I’m sure there are too many to count.

The visual effects were also something to be amazed by. When we are in the regular world, the effects were minimal but they were present as they are in any movie.

It’s when we got to step inside the Oasis that the effects took over.

Every inch of the screen was covered in special effects, and every inch looked spectacular.

The sheer number of different character designs, the environment, and the overall effects and feel to the movie were inspiring and beautiful.

I don’t know what beat it in the awards shows in that year, but this movie was more than worth it.

I mean it must have taken a lot of man hours to do each scene, and the movie is over two hours long.

As much as I enjoyed the effects, the ones that really stood out to me were the moments where it was entirely computer generated; like the cars being built around the players, the mecha-godzilla vs. Gundam fight scene, and even the player’s displays that would pop up.

Overall, I recommend this movie to anyone who likes an action movie and is older than 5 years-old. It is fun, exciting, and full of a lot of “ohh look its the ninja turtles” moments.

Did you enjoy Ready Player One? Let’s talk about it in the comments, or message me on social media.
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Book Review: How to Train Your Dragon by Cressida Cowell

Rating: ★★★☆☆

Hiccup Horrendous Haddock III is a truly extraordinary Viking hero known throughout Vikingdom as “the Dragon Whisperer”…but it wasn’t always so. Travel back to the days when the mighty warrior was just a boy, the quiet and thoughtful son of the Chief of the Hairy Hooligans. Can Hiccup capture a dragon and train it without being torn limb from limb? Join the adventure as the small boy finds a better way to train his dragon and become a hero!

The third and final movie in the How to Train Your Dragon trilogy came out over the weekend, so I figured it would be a good idea to give a review of the book that started it all.

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I read this book when I was a kid, obsessed with dragons and knights and everything magical and mystical.

I originally thought the movies were only based off of the first book, because I thought that there only was one book. I had no idea that there was a whole series about the How to Train Your Dragon world.

The movie was good, I saw it on the weekend, but I thought the book was good too.

I honestly don’t remember a good portion of the book, but from what I do remember it was a sort of “manual” of how to train a dragon, and the main character Hiccup had to do just that, with a dragon he later calls toothless, who he needs to pass the initiation for his Viking Tribe.

It’s a fun little book. I don’t remember ever reading a book where the dragon was considered a “pet” of sorts, but I thought How to Train Your Dragon took the idea and played off of it well.

If you’ve seen the movie but haven’t had a chance to read the book yet but plan on it, don’t get your hopes up too high. In this case the book and the movies are VERY different from each other, but in this case I’m actually okay with it.

The general premise is the same. A scrawny viking chief-to-be has to fit in with his culture and train a dragon but that’s basically where the similarities end.

Some characters have the same names, some dragons too, but the overall story is different.

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Usually I get upset because the movies ruin the books for the most part, but in this case I think the movies did a fantastic job at taking their source material and making it something new. I wouldn’t say the books are better per se, they’re just different.

Did you know How to Train Your Dragon was a book before it was a movie? Have you read it? Or if you’ve seen the movie I’d love to discuss the new movie in the comments, I really enjoyed it. 

Next week I’m gonna take a look at a book with different short stories in it, given to me by some wonderful authors. The book might be a little spooky, so I’m excited.

Books vs. Movies

I’m not entirely sure this topic is actually a debate where people will change their minds. As far as I know it’s not actually a debate between two parties, but two different groups who don’t even know they’re debating.

To make it more clear, I’ll lay out both sides of the “debate” here.

First, the movie side.

The biggest aspect of this side, is mainly that they don’t tend to read the books that get turned into movies, they may not even know they were a book before actually seeing the movie.

That’s not saying they don’t read books, I just mean they aren’t reading the books that generally get turned into movies. Since they don’t read the books, they obviously prefer the movies.

Now the book side.

These people obviously tend to read the books before the movies come out, and if they haven’t by the time when the movie comes out, they’ll most likely buy the books if they are interested.

They prefer the books because they get more out of it. They get the full story, with nothing left out. They get every magical word that the author created, and they get to use their imagination to see the world as they read it.

This is where the “debate” comes to a stand-still. The movie lovers tend not to like/read the books, and the book lovers tend to prefer the books.

I don’t think this is one where there is a right and a wrong answer though. I enjoy books, obviously, and I enjoy movies.

Do I enjoy the books more than the movies? Yeah, but that doesn’t mean the movies are bad, the movies are just a different experience.

It gives the director a chance to take words, and create a thing of magic.

My biggest problem with books that are turned into movies is when they are done poorly.

If you make a movie about a book, you’re guarenteeing that a good chunk of those fans will come see the movie, so to create something that ruins their favourite books is a big no no in their eyes.

Now this whole post assumes that everyone who reads the books will always prefer them over the movies.

In my experience this is 95% true. There has only been 2 instances in my life, where I know someone prefers the movies over the books.

The first: my dad loves the movie The Hunt for Red October. I can’t say I’ve ever read it or seen it, but he can quote the entire movie from heart, and he can walk in at any part of the movie and know exactly what is going on and what happens next.

He had seen the movie before he read the book, and will choose the movie every time

The second instance is a friend of mine read The Martian, and said that he could barely understand the book, but he really enjoyed the movie.

I may be wrong about all this, and maybe there are a large population of people in the world that prefer the movies over the books.

If you prefer a movie over a book please let me know. I’d love to hear from you all in the comments.

Also, if you’re wondering what I think about books vs. tv shows, then you’ll have to stay tuned. That is a different topic entirely.