Ultimate Blog Tour Book Review: The Devil’s Apprentice

Title: The Devil’s Apprentice
Author: Kenneth B. Anderson
Rating: 8/10


Philip is a good boy, a really good boy, who accidentally gets sent to Hell to become the Devil’s heir. The Devil, Lucifer, is dying and desperately in need of a successor, but there’s been a mistake and Philip is the wrong boy. Philip is terrible at being bad, but Lucifer has no other choice than to begin the difficult task of training him in the ways of evil. Philip gets both friends and enemies in this odd, gloomy underworld—but who can he trust, when he discovers an evil-minded plot against the dark throne? 


Hello dear readers! I know this week has been a bit different in terms of my posting, but today is finally the day.

I joined a Blog tour for the first time, and the pleasure of getting to read The Devil’s Apprentice, which turned out to be much more enjoyable than I was expecting it to be.

Before I start, I just want to thank TheWriteReads for giving me this opportunity. If you don’t already follow them on Twitter, then you are definitely missing out!

They gave me an ecopy version of this book in exchange for an honest review of it…and honestly I liked it.

Now let us get into the review.


The first thing that came to mind when reading this book, was the writing style. It took maybe three pages before I realized how unique the writing style was.

As I was reading through it, all I could think about was how immersed I felt into the story.

It was as if I was the characters in the story, I was feeling anxiety, stress, and whatever other emotions they might have been feeling.

It was a different experience than I am used to, but it was definitely enjoyable.


I also found this book was a nice mix of seriousness and humour. It’s a refreshing break when you can find both of those in one book, especially in a book that does it as well as this one.

The whole premise of the book is pretty funny if you think about it. Philip, a good boy that is being bullied at school is probably the last person you’d imagine running Hell, but he is the one that is chosen to be The Devil’s Apprentice.


Going back to the writing of the book, I found the characters to be very well developed. It’s not often I am rooting for the “bad” guys, (though I have on occassion) but I found myself rooting for a Demon or two through this book.

The main character Philip changes at a nice pace through the book. As the book continues, he realizes he has committed many of the seven deadly sins.

I never felt like this change of character was forced, or out of place, or moving too fast. It all seemed to fit pretty well into his character.


Book Review: Viking: Odinn’s Child

Title: Viking: Odinn’s Child
Author: Tim Severin
Rating: 6/10


Happy Monday fellow readers. As always, Monday is book review day, and today I am taking a look at Viking: Odinn’s Child by Tim Severin.


In 1001, the young child, Thorgils Leiffson, son of Leif the Lucky and Thorgunna, arrives on the shores of Greenland to be brought up by a young woman—Gudrid. Thorgils is a rootless character of quicksilver intelligence and adaptability. He has inherited his mother’s ability of second sight, and his mentors teach him the ancient ways and warn him of the invasion of the “White Christ” into the land of the “Old Gods.” Guided by a restless quest for adventure and the wanderlust of his favored god, Odinn, Thorgils’ fortunes will take him into worlds of unimaginable danger and discovery.


Odinn’s Child was one of my first real experiences into the historical fiction genre and Viking culture as a whole.

I had been a fan of history and fantasy since I started reading, but most of the stories that I experienced and fell in love with up to this point were Ancient Mediterranean or the Middle Ages.

Knights. Dragons. Magical swords. Castles.

Demi-Gods, Ancient heroes. Magical Monsters.

These were the stories that wowed me as a young reader, because Vikings, Ancient Egypt, and dozens of other cultures weren’t brought to my attention as much.

Odinn’s child changed that though. It opened my eyes to what the Vikings were, and the Norse Mythology that came along with them.


Norse Mythology, bloody battles, and a brief glimpse into the world of 1000s Europe, Odinn’s child is the first volume in the Viking Trilogy and all 350 odd pages will leave you wanting more.

The story follows a young boy, Thorgils Leiffson, the son of Leif the Lucky and Thorgunna as he arrives in Greenland to be fostered by a young woman – Gudrid.

Thorgils is a quick witted, intelligent, and very adaptable character that has inherited his mother’s ability of second sight.

Thorgils, who is basically orphaned, is raised by various mentors during his time in Greenland. They teach him the ways to worship the Norse Gods, along with their ancient customs, and warn him of the ‘White Christ’ that is making its way into the land of the ‘Old Gods’

Thorgils has a sense of adventure and looks to Odinn as his favoured god. Death, battle, disease, execution, and shipwreck are just some of the adventures that await Thorgils in Odinn’s child.


Severin does a good job of giving readers a steady look into Thorgils progression from a boy to a man.

He learns from several mentors, about many different things, but it never seems rushed, despite being contained within 350 odd pages.

The look into the Viking culture and the spread of Christianity into their lifestyle is an interesting plot for the book.

It’s not the major plot-line, but it nicely compliments the story and helps drive it forward by introducing new conflicts and characters.


Historical fiction isn’t a genre that I have delved too deeply into, but I want to get into the genre. I still have my copy of Odinn’s child from when I read it as a young teenager, and I might read it again to re-experience a series I loved as a kid.

AudioBook Review: Outlander

I have said before that it is a rare occurrence for a TV show or movie to be better than the book, but Outlander is one of those books that might just be an exception.

I had binge watched most of the TV show in a few weeks, knowing that there was a related book series, but I didn’t really feel like I had the time to start another series of books since I already had a few going at the time.

I had a free audio book that I could download, and I figured Outlander would be a good choice of book, and I am happy I was right.

Despite being a fantastic book, that the TV show is very similar to, I think an audiobook was a good call for Outlander, because the woman who was reading the story had a nice accent, and did a good job changing her voice slightly depending on who was speaking.

This is one of the few audiobooks I have listened to, but each one I listen to makes me love the medium more and more.


In terms of how the book actually was, I thought it was well written, very descriptive, and historically accurate (from my small understanding of that period in history).

I think when doing a historical fiction piece, it is important to get some level of accuracy, and I think Diana Gabaldon did a great job of writing about the period and the characters.

I haven’t read too many historical fiction pieces before, but I thought that I could really understand the period and the society that Gabaldon writes about in Outlander.

I haven’t learned a lot of this period in history, but I have done some research after watching the TV show, and from what I can tell Outlander is pretty spot on to what I could have expected.


Gabaldon’s writing style has caused her to quickly cracked my Top 10 favourite authors even though I only listened to one of her books.

I find her descriptive writing to be captivating enough that I can see myself in the story, but not overbearing that it becomes a grind getting through different scenes.

I think there is a time and place for overly descriptive writing. I think George R.R. Martin does a good job of it, but he is one of the few people that I have read that was able to do it well.

Gabaldon’s writing has enough description in it that there were times I could see the scene so perfectly, and the sex scenes were…interesting to say the least.


I think a historical-fiction book does its’ job when it makes the reader want to explore more. After listening to the entire book on my walks to and from work every day, I watched a few other shows about Scotland and their history. I also did some light reading online about Scotland and their fights for independence.

As you probably know, I am a lover of history, and Outlander has definitely made me want to dive a little deeper into the historical fiction genre.


I plan on continuing the series in the future, but not any time soon. There’s a few other series I want to finish first, but I won’t forget Outlander because I really enjoy the TV show.

Book Review: The Path of Daggers

Since I finished this book on Friday, and I am morally and internally obligated to cover it as soon as possible, and since this is the first book review after Friday, here it is.

The Path of Daggers is the eighth installment in The Wheel of Time series, and in my opinion is one of the better ones (at least from what I’ve read so far).

Unfortunately we don’t get any Mat in this book. He’s still recovering from his injuries he obtained at the end of the last book, but him being away is related to one of the main reasons I like this book so much.

About 75% of The Path of Daggers takes place over a few days/weeks. I think about the first half of the book is different characters doing whatever it is they were doing after book seven.

It’s nice because we aren’t rushing ahead weeks and months with no real progression. Not that it’s bad or anything, but I like the story being fleshed out days and weeks at a time.

So on one hand we don’t get Mat, but on the other hand we get a shorter timeline which I really enjoy. I guess you have to pick your battles right?

The last 25% ish of the book does a pretty big time jump, but in this instance it makes sense for the time jump.

Since the weather has been “corrected” and heavy snow falls now cover the land, all of the main parties are slowed down heavily.

Where normally people would take a week or two to get somewhere, the snow is taking people a month or more to get to the same place.

Hence the time jump. We just skip that month or so, and get ready for book nine which has a lot of stuff ready to go.

What’s most enjoyable about TPOD is that there is very minimal “mystical” confrontations.

The Wheel of Time series has an overall enemy who is, to sum it up briefly, Satan, and the good guys need to beat him. He has incredibly powerful lieutenants that are the main bad guys for most of the books, but TPOD doesn’t follow that rule.

TPOD has minimal interaction with these Darkfriends, and instead focuses on the other, regular enemies and their goals and ambitions. Allies become traitors, enemies remain enemies, and some “friends” show their true colours.

I’m a sucker for cliffhangers, and we have three different ones that we are left with at the end of the book.

Perrin and his group have two by themselves, and I think I’m most excited for those ones right now. We know Mat will be coming back with a vengeance after resting up for over a month, Egwene has rested her troops and is on the warpath, and Elayne has finally made it to her rightful place.

Plenty of story lines have me hooked right now which is good. Usually there’s only one or two story lines per book that I want to see unfold, and maybe by the end something interesting happens or is set up for the other characters, but as it is now, I’m excited to see what happens to just about every character/group.

Book Review: The Name of the Wind

I’ve written three different reviews for this book, and for some reason none of them are posting or saving in any way so I’m a bit annoyed and tired of the post, so I’ll keep the review short.

This book seems to have been gaining a bit of popularity since I read it a few years ago. I honestly can’t remember where I found it, or even where the book came from, but I’m glad it magically appeared on my shelves.

I liked the book a lot, especially seeing Kvothe grow up and discover the world, but I was not a fan of the time jumps that would happen every so often.

I wanted the time jumps to be more fleshed out, giving me a bit more of the main course of the story instead of making me upset that I wasn’t getting more story, but that might be my opinion.

Sorry again for the short post but I spent three hours today trying to make this post and it wasn’t working so I’m just going to admit defeat.

Book Review: A Crown of Swords

I just finished up A Crown of Swords just last week, and since I am morally obligated to review any book I finish recently as soon as I can, here it is.

Every time I open up a Wheel of Time book, I get a bit nervous about what’s coming for me.

I mean there are 14 books in the series, some of them are bound to be a bit more dull than the others.

Game of Thrones suffered from some dull moments, and there are less than half the amount of Wheel of Time books. So far, I haven’t been disappointing. For the most part, Wheel of Time books have a lot of moments that are spectacular, and some that are dull, but necessary.

A Crown of Swords fit that description, but one thing I will give it, that I don’t remember happening to me in any of the previous books, was that the events in the book seemed to fly by.

I’ll probably do a bad job at explaining it, but when I was reading it, I would sometimes find myself chapters further in the book, and twenty minutes had gone by.

You know the old saying, Time flies when you’re having fun. That fit perfectly when I was reading this one, and I don’t think I had experienced it in any other Wheel of Time book.

I think what made the book fun for me was Mat. As of now he is my favourite character, and he was heavily prominent in this segment of the series. That, mixed with other character plots and setting up future events in the series really made me enjoy the book a lot more than I was hoping for.

But, as much as I liked A Crown of Swords, it was not perfect. In fact, there were some classic Robert Jordan moments in it that get on my nerves whenever they happen.

Jordan likes to have an overarching villain throughout the series, which is fine, and give him some Lieutenants that sort of do his dirty work while we wait to get to the main villain.

I don’t mind the concept. In fact I’d prefer it because we can sort of see the main characters grow and become stronger over time, defeating more and more bad guys.

A problem that Jordan has though, is that he will introduce some bad guys, fleshing them out three or four books before they become relevant again, and then in a snap of your fingers, the main characters win against him/her.

Nynaeve’s conflict against Mogedhien was completely relevant. We know there’s a grudge there, and we know that the two of them fighting in some way was going to happen.

Rand and Sammael had a conflict brewing, and we knew the fight between them would happen eventually, but to me it sort of seems their fight this book was rushed and unnecessary.

Rand is scheming all the time, and I understand that, but he literally wakes up from nearly dying a few days earlier, and instantly he brings some allies to go kill Sammael.

I know the battle needs to happen, but the second after he wakes up after being passed out for a few days, and against an opponent that I don’t think was mentioned more than once in the book previously.

Rand has a lot of wasted time in this book, so giving him a few chapters to better set up the conflict between himself and Sammael would have made a lot more sense.

And the battle itself ends in almost an instant. Rand shoots off some Baelfire, and BAM, fights over. Rand doesn’t even confirm that Sammael died, he just assumes that nobody could survive that attack and leaves it there.

As annoying as this was, I am excited for what Jordan did for Mat at the end of the book.

In his last chapter, Mat is searching Ebou Dar for Olver, as the city is being attacked by the Seanchan Empire. Mat basically gets thrown and crushed by rocks as they attack the city, and that’s where it stops.

I hope that the book continues from there, or not long after. I know in The Path of Daggers, he isn’t present because of his injuries in the attack, which was the same as Perrin earlier, but Mat’s storyline is one of my favourite ones in the books, so I am excited to see where he goes from his present situation.

overall, A Crown of Swords is a great book. I’d put it in the upper half of the Wheel of Time books I’ve read so far.

Book Review: Legend by Marie Lu

I remember reading this book years ago in highschool as the first book in the book club I had just joined.

We got to pick books out of a crate and I was one of the last ones to pick, and the cover of Legend looked interesting.

I started reading it on the bus ride home that afternoon and I was done by the end of the week.

I was hooked in an instant. It was an easy YA book to read, and it was the first book that I read that had a dystopian theme to it. I was putting my foot in the water with Legend, and quickly dove right in because I loved it so much.

One thing I really enjoyed about Legend was jumping between two different perspectives. Marie Lu wrote her entire trilogy about Day and June, two “perfect” characters, or so their tests and evaluations tell us, who have two different experiences in life.

June is hunting down Day, whom she believed killed her brother, and we get to see their interactions from both perspectives.

Usually having different perspectives in the same book isn’t much of a big deal because plenty of books do it.

That is true, but most of them have different character perspectives because they are focusing on different parts of the world, and having just one person’s perspective wouldn’t give readers a large enough scope of what is happening.

In Legend, and the other two books in the series, Day and June spend a lot of time together.

Day is from the poorer part of society, and we get to experience his life as a rebel, helping out the poor much like a Robin Hood sort of figure. He pulls off some pretty insane stunts and is a genius in his own regard, he just does things on his own.

June on the other hand, works for the “government”. She is top of her class, and like June, is able to perform some very remarkable physical stunts and is also a genius in her own regard. She is also fairly well off in life, and hasn’t known poverty.

The two different perspectives in the books is a nice change. It gives us the poor and the rich side to everything. When one character is living their everyday life, the other is exploring it for the first time, and as a reader, this style of reading was nice, because it’s different.

June knows her truth of certain events that happen in the book, and Day knows his truth. Jumping between perspectives gives us a look at the inner thoughts of both characters when the time is right, but also puts us outside of their mind and their thoughts when the stroy needs it to happen.

Marie Lu has done a wonderful job utilizing the different perspectives and making the two characters bounce off of eachother nicely.

Like I said, it is a fairly easy read, but it is good. If you like dystopian style books mixed with some spy and mystery novel aspects I recommend Legend.