Sabran IX Berethnet: A Queen of Legacy

Hello my dear readers. After many weeks of putting it down to finish other books, I finally finished The Priory of the Orange Tree.

This isn’t a review of the book, that will come some time in the future, hopefully soon. Instead, I want to analyze one of the main characters that stuck out to me during the book; Sabran IX, the ruler of the Queendom of Inys.

Some of these opinions might be seen as controversial, and if you agree or disagree with me, we should talk about it in the comments, or send me a message on social media.
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She’s Flawed

My favourite thing about Sabran is that she is far from perfect and confident. She is very much a flawed character, and that is what makes her story so much more interesting.

She is a young Queen, but a strong ruler.

She has her fears about having children, and pursues immortality instead. She has fears that plenty of young women have.

Childbirth can be a scary thing for anybody, even a queen. If the power of immortality was at your fingertips, wouldn’t you think of pursuing it too?

Samantha Shannon, author of The Priory of the Orange Tree

She’s Conflicted

Sabran has lived her entire life with other voices in her head, making decisions for her. She is the Queen, but she’s had advisors and other nobles limiting her freedom of thought.

Because of this, we see her doubt. We see her unsure of herself when she has a moment of privacy that the reader gets to explore. On the surface, she is a strong, more than capable queen. When we can tear wear the tough exterior, she is scared, she is unsure, she is exhausted.

It can’t be easy being a Queen, and when you’ve had a parentless existence like she has, you can imagine how lonely it can be.


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She’s Romantic

Marriage is one thing Sabran tried to avoid when she was young. She didn’t want to marry, she wanted to be immortal instead.

When love finally comes her way, it’s as if she dives into it head first. She opens herself up to it, and she enjoys it. All of her fears are put to the side, and she accepts the beautiful things that love can bring.

That’s when her world is torn apart.

Sabran finally accepts love. She realizes the good it can bring, and how happy it can make her, and then it is ripped from her.

Her husband and her child are taken from her. The two things she was terrified to go through with were torn from her, her fears come true.

The emotional and mental destruction that would bring on anyone. She spent years avoiding them, and it is almost as if her fears made it a reality.

When Sabran realizes her feelings for Ead, it’s as if her pieces are put back together, slowly, but much stronger.

Cover from Goodreads

She allows herself to feel again, despite all the pain and fear it has brought her.

This time, she finds the love of her life. She finds her other half, and even when she falls into more emotional moments, where Ead is in danger, she keeps a strong head and does what needs to be done.

She may love Ead, but she knows when she needs to be a lover and when she needs to be a fighter.


She’s Strong

It’s never directly stated, but it seems like Sabran’s ancestors have always suffered from depressive episodes.

It’s fairly well known, and Sabran experiences a few throughout the book.

What I like about her, is that she comes back from these dark moments, and she steps up when the time is right.

A thousand years of “destiny” and “prophecy” are on Sabran’s shoulders. She believes she is the sole reason that the end of the world is alive. She believes if her lineage ends, the Nameless One will rise and destroy the world.

When a High Welters, the strongest of the dragons besides the Nameless One, comes to her doorstep, she doesn’t hesitate in confronting it. She knows she could die with one swipe of its tail, but she confronts it as if she could kill it with her gaze alone.


She’s Wise

As we make it further into The Priory of the Orange Tree, the entirety of Sabran’s religion is tested more than once.

The truth to the origin story of her religion is proven wrong, and then wrong again.

Despite this, she is understanding, and she is open minded. She could remain ignorant, sticking to her beliefs of what her and her people have been taught for hundreds of years.

It would be the easiest thing for her to do, but she is willing to accept the truth to it all, and learn from it.

Fan art of Sabran IX from the PotOT Wiki

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Sabran’s character is far from perfect. She’s a bit of a bitch at times during the start of the book, but as we get to know her more and more, we understand why.

We understand her thoughts and actions more and more, and we realize she is an amazing character.

Sabran is definitely my favorite part of The Priory of the Orange Tree. She provides a wonderful emotional thread to the story, and it’s always refreshing to have a character that acts with her mind and heart, instead of just her heart.

Fan art of Sabran IX from the PotOT Wiki

What did you think of Sabran IX? I’d love to talk about her, or this book in the comments, or on social media.
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Dungeons and Dragons Character Creation: Gloomstalker Ranger

Hello my dear dice rollers, I have a new series for you.

I have been playing Dungeons and Dragons (D&D) on and off for a little over a year now, and I LOVE it. It has been so much fun making new characters, taking them on adventures, and solving puzzles using nothing but my imagination, a sheet of paper, and some dice.

Since I love it so much, then I am forcing you to love it now too!

What I want to do with this series is just make new characters. You can use these characters in your campaign, you can use them for your stories that you are writing, or just as inspiration for a character of your own.

I want to paint a picture before your eyes, giving you the character’s backstory, his traits, his personality, his fighting style, his basic stats. Everything I can to help make this character as complete as I can for you.

In the future, I’ll do more of these characters, some will be ones I have played, some will be ones I have just made up for you, but I also want to do a deeper dive into different aspects of D&D; spells, races, monsters, etc.

So, I hope you enjoy this post, so that I can keep writing about Dungeons and Dragons because I find it is such a blast!

If you have any races, or classes that you want me to create, let me know in the comments or on social media! I am always looking for fun and interesting combinations for new characters.
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Jaecar Dathe the Gloomstalker Ranger

Backstory:

Jaecar Dathe {ja-car day-th} (meaning hunter of death) is a Drow Elf Ranger that took the Gloomstalker Archetype. His parents were both noble born, but of rival houses. Being in love and with child, they ran from the Underdark and found safety in a small merchant town that was popular with the unwanted races of the world.

However, their luck didn’t last long, as a band of Drow hunters eventually tracked them to this small town, eventually killing Jaecar’s parents when he was just a young boy. Alone, and with nobody willing to look after him, Jaecar did the only thing he knew how to do; survive.

Mastering the bow and the longsword by the time he was just a teen, he couldn’t forsake the village he lived in, and where his parents rested, even though they all but cast him out.

Jaecar lived in the nearby woods, defending the town from bands of marauders, protecting hunters from wild animals, and even preventing an army sergeant from conscripting the town’s male population during times of war.

But, there is only so much one elf can do on his own. One day, in the cover of darkness, that same band of Drow hunters came to town after learning he lived their first assault. They slaughtered almost the entire town before Jaecar could stop them, but by then it was too late. What little remained of the village actively cast him out, banishing him, never knowing all he had done for them.


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Personality Traits, Ideals, Bonds, and Flaws:

Personality traits:
Jaecar always tries to protect those who cannot protect themselves, even though most times they despise him on sight.
Though he doesn’t seek out death, he doesn’t shy away from it, and often enjoys hurting those who he believes are evil.

Ideals:
Protect those who cannot protect themselves, even though they will never thank you for it just because of your race.

Bonds:
Nearly none, but he often finds himself attaching himself to those who don’t instantly throw him to the side or look down on him.

Flaws:
Stubborn and can be nearsighted when it comes to achieving his goals.


Stats and Weaponry

Stats are up to you, but as a Ranger you will want Dexterity, Strength and Wisdom to be your highest three, probably in that order.

In terms of weapons, Jaecar likes to kill from a distance, utilizing his stealth skills to kill an enemy before they even know they were under attack.


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Other Information:

Alignment: Chaotic Good
Background: Outlander
Darkvision: 90 ft.
Fey Ancestry: Advantage on saving throws vs. being charmed
: Magic can’t put him to sleep
Archery: +2 to ranged attack roles
Favoured Enemy: Your choice depending on campaign
Natural Explorer: Your choice, I did forests based off the city’s geography
Dread Ambusher: +10 ft. movement on first turn of each combat
: +1 to attack rolls (add 1d8 damage)
Umbral Sight: Invisible to Darkvision users while covered in darkness.


Spellcasting

Spell choices will be up to you depending on how you want to play Jaecar, but I went for a bit of healing, with Hunter’s Mark and Disguise Self to add to my stealthiness. At higher levels you may want to use the geography around you in your spell casting, or maybe try to focus more on communicating with nature. It’s entirely up to you.

Harry Potter, The Boy Who Lived: A Character Analysis

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Hello dear readers, I hope you are doing well. Today I am going to give you a new post idea that I am excited for.

I wanted to do a character analysis on some of the more famous characters in literature. This won’t be anything that goes into the nitty gritty details, but it will have some depth to it, so I hope you enjoy!

The first will be about someone I would argue is in the top 10 most well-known book characters of all time.

These are opinions are my own, and I understand some may disagree with them. If you do, let’s talk about it!

From the beginning, Harry is a loyal lapdog to Dumbledore. He sees that Dumbledore is often right, and knows more about what is going on, so Harry decides to put his absolute trust in Dumbledore. Even when being loyal to Dumbledore gets him into trouble, Harry follows him without question.

Harry creates an order of underage wizards, calling them Dumbledore’s Army, to fight against the rising threat of Voldemort. Of all the magical items, beings, and creatures in his world, he names his army after the man he looks up to the most.

When Dumbledore ultimately dies, Harry is determined to follow in his footsteps, and fulfilling his destiny of defeating Voldemort.

This loyalty to Dumbledore is supplemented with his loyalty to his friends, Ron and Hermione. He befriends them in his first year of Hogwarts, and only grows closer to them as the years go on. Though he is loyal to them, and trusts them completely, he sees them more of an equal than a mentor.

It is because of these three relationships that Harry grows into a curious, determined, brave wizard, one fitting the Gryffindor name…

But what does being a Gryffindor ultimately mean? It’s one simple word. Brave.

The only real requirement to be considered a Gryffindor is bravery, but that’s a vague ideal. Bravery can mean many things. Cedric Diggory was brave, but ultimately he wasn’t Gryffindor. All those who joined the DA? Yeah, some were Gryffindor, but some weren’t. They were all brave because they knew they could get into trouble.

We know that Harry should have been a Slytherin, but he told the hat he wanted to be anything but. The next natural choice? The house he almost perfectly fits into.

Harry isn’t particularly smart, he’s not overly skilled at anything but flying a broom, and I would argue he is slightly better than average in a fight.

Then what makes him a good main character? Despite all his flaws, he is brave. He is always the first out of the gate, whether it’s chasing down the Dark Lord, going to his death in the Forbidden Forest, or running through Platform 9 3/4 after just discovering magic.

His bravery is the one thing that holds him above the rest, and his loyalty to his friends, to Dumbledore, and to his destiny are accounts to that.


If you tear away all of the Boy Who Lived prophecy talk about Harry, and look at who he is as a wizard, he is extremely ordinary. He pales in comparison to the famous witches and wizards we hear of. Dumbledore, Voldemort, Snape, McGonnagal. They’re all amazing at what they do, but Harry isn’t. Harry wouldn’t be special in any sense of the word if it wasn’t for his destiny.

I would even argue it is because his destiny, that he is who he is. He grew up not knowing anything about his true self, but when he finally discovers it, he lets it shape him. He lets it fill his every fiber and turn him into the true Gryffindor.

We lose sight of how unremarkable Harry really is when he arrives at Hogwarts.

When he is with the Dursleys, he is treated like trash, but he is definitely far from special. There’s nothing about him that stands out other than he is abused and mistreated. When he gets to Hogwarts, the tides change and suddenly he is like a hero out of legend.

The Boy Who Lived is whispered around the halls, and suddenly he’s the hero of a world he never knew existed. It takes some time, but not much until Harry experiences confidence in himself.

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With his newfound fame and confidence, Harry could become the next Lockhart, boasting about his accomplishment.

Instead he doesn’t. He doesn’t particularly like his fame. He treats those that could be seen as less than him, as equals. He detests Malfoy’s use of the word Mudblood, he treats a house elf with kindness and respect, he doesn’t detest Filch as a squib.


But with this internal sense of respect, Harry also has an internal sense of what is right and wrong, often to the point of putting himself and loved ones in danger.

He doesn’t let others tell him what to do, he decides for himself. If it means breaking the rules for the greater good? Then so be it.

Harry decides what is right and what is wrong, and often answers the evil with violence. We rarely see him think before acting. Whenever Harry needs to think to solve a problem, he has Ron, Hermione, or any one of his Hogwarts friends and allies to help him.

Instead of coming up with a plan to defeat his enemies, Harry is often lucky, or gets help from someone. It is rare that he thinks a problem through before acting.


But that is part of what makes Harry the hero that he is. He isn’t special in a lot of ways, but he is loyal and he is trusting. He has allies that he can rely on and that rely on him. Friends, classmates, mentors, family. He has people beside him almost every step of the way to lift him up when he needs the help.

Sirius, the Weasleys, Hermione, Ron, Lupin. These and many more help Harry, whether it is through connections in the past, or a connection to Harry.

Harry’s true power isn’t being the most powerful wizard. His true power is uniting people, and relying on each other to vanquish the darkness. He never had a true family, but the love of his parents, and the family he makes through his time at Hogwarts is what helps him defeat Voldemort.


With his reliance on others, comes weakness. Harry isn’t perfect, he is human. He gets angry. He gets stressed. He falls in love. He feels the wait of Umbridge’s reign of Hogwarts.

It is the weakness that makes him relatable. It makes him someone who can be understood, someone that readers can see themselves as.

Harry loses many friends and family members along the way. Family he never knew, family he came to love over time, and family he only realized he had when it was too late.

These losses make Harry a stronger person. They hurt him, but at the same time they mold him, shape him into who he is. The losses show him that life is painful, that it isn’t all magical as he sometimes forgets.

Harry could give up at any point in his many years at Hogwarts. Each year he struggles with friends, school, and is constantly fighting for his life. He rarely has a moment of rest, but that was Voldemort’s mistake. Each struggle, each battle, each hardship gives Harry the strength he needs to endure, and an ally that will support him till the end.


A lot can be taken away from studying Harry’s character, whether good or bad. Some say he is too headstrong, acting without thinking, and other potentially harmful behaviour.

Others see Harry as a good example, one who follows through with his actions, is a loyal friend and will do what he believes is good.

Everyone will have their own opinions, and they are welcome to.

Personally I am not a fan of the Harry Potter series as a whole, but I do realize that it is something that a lot of people love.

It has lessons that can be learned, it has characters that can be aspired to, it has ideals that can be upheld.

What do you think of Harry. Was he someone you looked up to, or was he a brash fool. I don’t think there is one correct answer to this, so let’s talk about it in the comments or on social media.
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Book Review: Dungeons and Dragons Player’s Handbook

Hello again dear readers. I hope life is treating you kindly. This is a bit of an odd review today, because this book isn’t one a lot of people would probably read cover to cover, but that’s exactly why I thought I should review it for you today.

If you don’t play, or have any interest in Dungeons and Dragons, then this review might not be for you, but it might surprise you!

I am a huge fan of Dungeons and Dragons, and though I am no expert, and have only played a few small campaign, I love the roleplaying aspect to it all. I plan on coming out with a lot of Dungeons and Dragons content this year…so stay tuned!

Title: Dungeons and Dragons Player’s Handbook
Author: Wizards RPG Team
Illustrator: Various (but all brilliant)
Rating: 4.5 / 5

Obviously, the Player’s Handbook doesn’t offer much in terms of story, because it is a guide to creating a character for your Dungeons and Dragons campaign.

It’s got races, classes, magic, backstories, inventory, character traits, and so much more if you are willing to dive into its pages.

If you’ve ever seen the book, you know its not a book that would be easy to read cover to cover, but I have basically done that a few times.

Every time I create a new character, and I do that more often than I actually play the game, I flip through the book cover to cover finding new information and interesting bits of information.


The reason I love flipping through this book all the time is because of what my imagination does to the information.

Being a creative person, I love absorbing new ideas and turning them into my own.

The Player’s Handbook is filled with potential stories, characters, creatures, and worlds…all just waiting to be explored.

It doesn’t take long, while flipping through the book, to create a new character, write his story in your head, and see him leave for a quest to slay some evil monster.


I bought the Player’s Handbook the day after creating my first character, and I quickly create new characters the moment after I hear about a potential campaign.

It’s definitely a bad habit, but I don’t complain.

Sometimes I like to create characters out of the blue, giving them some cool backstory and motivations.

I don’t just use this book as inspiration to create characters for a Dungeons and Dragons campaign, but I use it as inspiration for story characters.

The Handbook has given me dozens of ideas for characters, magical items, and other ideas for the story I am slowly working on.

Its been a slow process, but Dungeons and Dragons has done a lot to inspire me to create some amazing characters for the book I will one day write.


The artwork in the Handbook is also something to be amazed by. Flipping through the book, you can find a piece of artwork on almost every page, and each of them are beautiful to look at.

Whether it’s a dwarf ready to smash someone with a hammer, a druid readying for battle while wearing her tiger cloak, or a wizard casting a powerful spell.

The artwork is detailed, and adds to the imagination drawn forth from the book. I love looking over the pictures and seeing a new detail every time.


If you liked this review, and want to see other Dungeons and Dragons content coming in the future, please follow me on social media.
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