Solve it Sunday: The Eight Queens

Dear readers, I hope you like chess, or at least have a basic understanding of the concepts because you’ll need to know how one of the pieces work.

If you like this puzzle, or are interested in solving other ones, make sure to follow me on social media!
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Max Bezzel, a German chess master, was the first to pose this question, in 1848. It has provided plenty of material for discussion since then.

A chess queen attacks in eight directions — vertical, horizontal, and diagonal straight lines. His question was whether it was possible to place eight queens on a regular 8×8 chess board so that none of them could attack any other.

Are you able to find a way to do it?

Solve it Sunday: A Bit of Polish

Hello dear readers, I hope you put on your puzzle solving hats, because I am back for another Solve it Sunday!

This one might be tricky for those who don’t live with snow in the winter, but you might know the answer anyways.

Here is the riddle, and as always, the solution is in the comments:

You will most likely have noticed that polished floors are considerably more slippery than rough (or fluffy) ones. So should it not follow that smooth ice is more slippery than bumpy ice? If you ever have occasion to pull a sledge, however, you will discover that it moves more easily over uneven ice than over smooth ice. You may also have observed that roughened ice is trickier to walk on than glossy ice.

Why do you think that is?

Solve it Sunday: In A Spin

Hello everyone! I’m back with another post for Solve it Sunday after missing last week.

I hope you enjoy this one. It was a lot of fun talking through it with some friends, seeing if we could find an answer.

Thanks to the work of Copernicus, Galileo, and may others, we know that the day happens because the world rotates on its axis, while the sun remains (apparently) still. But it is not always wise to blindly believe what you are told.

It would be reasonably straightforward to conduct an experiment that would prove that the Earth is revolving on its axis. You wouldn’t even need to leave the Earth’s surface.

Can you think of one?

Solve it Sunday: Gold Standard

This question may seem laughable at first glance. I assure you, however, that I have no intention of making sport with you. Simplicity does not always indicate triviality.

Which is heavier – a 1-ton block of wood, or a 1-ton block of gold?

You may assume that both blocks are being weighed on the same weighing apparatus in the same terrestrial location, and that the machine is giving an identical value in both cases.

Good luck with this one! It’s not as simple as you might think it is.
As always, answers in the comments.

Solve it Sunday: A Curious Thought

This one might be a bit trickier than you think. It got me when I first read it, but read it carefully before you think you have the answer.

As always…answers in the comments

It has been said that the ultimate in exclusivity would be to build a house which possessed windows facing south on each of its four sides.

Does this seem a reasonable proposition?

Solve it Sunday: Ciphertext

This is a quote made my Albert Einstein. If you can find it then maybe you’d be able to recognize it. Good luck!

In this puzzle, the challenge is to decrypt a quotation that has been made obscure by the use of a simple cypher. Are you able to work out what it says?

Solve it Sunday: High Wire

Are you scared of heights? This riddle is all about high-wire walking. No math involved, just some critical thinking or maybe some random knowledge involved.

An incredible amount of skill, dedication and fitness is required to master the art of high-wire walking. However, when you see such a masterful athlete proceeding to and fro over a dizzying drop armed with nothing more than a long, saggy bar, bear in mind that perhaps the feat is somewhat less insanely risky than it may appear.

Can you say why?

Good luck! I didn’t know the answer to this one, but maybe you can solve it.