Movie Review: Frozen 2

“What? A movie review on a Monday? That’s not right, Mondays are for book reviews!”

I know, I know, it’s crazy, but this week is going to be a little mixed up because of something special I have coming on Saturday.

There will still be a book review this week, but it’ll just be on a new day…so until then, enjoy a movie review.


There’s a reason that people say the original is always best, and Disney should stick to just making one movie, not sequels.

The original Frozen was a huge success. It was such a success that singing it was actually not allowed in some schools. Kids everywhere knew the movie by heart, and plenty of people knew the songs without ever having seen the movie (I was one of those people).

Frozen was a good movie. It played with some regular Disney movie tropes and changed the script for future Disney movies.

People were worshipping it left and right…and then time went on.

It wasn’t forgotten per se, it was just lost to time, and other movies came out. Moana was fairly popular with The Rock being a cast member, and then Frozen 2 was announced.


I was excited to see it from the trailer. It looked like it was going to be a good movie, but I am always a bit hesitant with sequels, because the story is never quite as good.

Turns out, I was right to worry.

The story for Frozen 2 wasn’t very good. It was way too predictable, relied on too many conveniences, and was way too reliant on small little story moments that didn’t add much to the overall piece.

Let’s not even talk about the abusive relationship between Kristoff and Anna (she probably needs a therapist to help deal with some issues). He tries to ask Anna to marry him the entire movie, but she either runs off to save Elsa or is too paranoid to let him speak.

Olaf loses any interest by his third joke that is too obviously for the parents in the theatre, and Sven is in the movie for maybe a minute.

The songs are less memorable, the additional characters add a minor bit of humor to the story, and its just not as entertaining as a whole.


The best part of this movie is Elsa.

Now that she has got some control of her powers, she is confident and ready to take action.

We see her act more than think in many situations through the movie, but it makes sense for her character, because she has just found her confidence again.

After being brainwashed to hide her powers and make sure she has them under control, she is free to use them whenever she wants.

She is confident in what she can do, as she should be. She is curious, and wants to fulfill the adventurous itch she experiences.


I wouldn’t say Frozen 2 is a bad movie. It was fun, lighthearted, and it had its funny moments.

I think my biggest issue was that it was a sequel that didn’t live up to my expectations, and that they were trying too hard for it to be a good movie. Or at least as good as the original.

I still recommend seeing it. Frozen 2 does answer a number of Disney fan theories out there, whether thats good or bad is up to you.


I also want to point out that this is a review from a grown adult man. Frozen 2 is probably a terrific kids movie, because it is a Disney movie after all, and kids love anything they make.


Have you seen Frozen 2? Did you enjoy it? Let’s talk about it in the comments.

The Snow Queen Review

Title: The Snow Queen
Author: Hans Christian Anderson
Rating: 6 / 10



Happy Monday again fellow readers. Since Frozen 2 just came out in theatres recently, I thought I would review the short story that inspired it all, The Snow Queen by Hans Christian Anderson.

”The Snow Queen” is the story of a little girl’s grit, her way with animals, and a magic mirror. It was written by Danish author Hans Christian Andersen in 1845. One of his longest and most famous tales, ”The Snow Queen” has been the inspiration for books and films, including Disney’s Frozen.

Despite being written in 1844, I actually quite enjoyed this little piece. The thing I liked about it the most is also the thing I disliked the most, but I’ll get into more of that now.

The Snow Queen is quite lacking. There are not a lot of details given in the seven different stories contained in this piece.

Anderson literally jumps months at a time in a matter of sentences, which can get frustrating because I wanted more substance to it.

I wanted the story to be fleshed out more, because I wanted to get into the mind of Anderson more.

He is a fantastic author, and one of the most famous authors in the world.

The fact that there isn’t much fleshing out of the story is also the great aspect of it too. Its not bogged down with pointless detail and story.

The reader gets to use their imagination to enjoy the piece, and fill in any blanks if and when they want.


The story is rather simple. Two friends, a Gerta and Kay, are playing together when Kay gets a piece of glass stuck in his eye. This glass was a part of a magical mirror that the hobgoblin possessed, but had now broken on the earth.

When Kay gets this mirror stuck in his eye and in his heart, he starts to see the worst in the world, and starts treating Gerta badly.

Kay gets taken away by The Snow Queen when he is out on his sled to her winter palace.

Gerta becomes worried when summer comes and nobody can find Kay, and asks the trees, the plants, the river, an evil old lady, a pirate, an old man to see if they knew where Kay had gone, until finally she found Kay in the Snow Queen’s castle.

Kay didn’t respond to Gerta at first, until her tears melted his frozen heart. The Snow Queen saw her reflection in Gerta’s mirror, turning her back into the kind little girl that she used to be, letting Kay and Gerta return to their home together.


If you know anything about Frozen, you know these stories are not similar at all.

Instead, there are some aspects of the two stories that overlap.

The frozen heart, Ice Queen, and the act of love thawing their heart are two of the aspects that overlap, but otherwise there’s nothing similar about them.

The Snow Queen is what it is. A short story that, at its time, was something of magic and wonderment. It’s a great story for kids and adults.

I hadn’t actually read the story until recently, and I quite enjoyed it. Its a simple piece to read, but I found it very inspiring and thought provoking.

Anderson is a fantastic author, and does a good job of creating a story filled with joy and wonder for all ages.


Have you read The Snow Queen? I’ve never spoken to someone who has, so let’s talk about it in the comments.

Book Review: Viking: Odinn’s Child

Title: Viking: Odinn’s Child
Author: Tim Severin
Rating: 6/10


Happy Monday fellow readers. As always, Monday is book review day, and today I am taking a look at Viking: Odinn’s Child by Tim Severin.


In 1001, the young child, Thorgils Leiffson, son of Leif the Lucky and Thorgunna, arrives on the shores of Greenland to be brought up by a young woman—Gudrid. Thorgils is a rootless character of quicksilver intelligence and adaptability. He has inherited his mother’s ability of second sight, and his mentors teach him the ancient ways and warn him of the invasion of the “White Christ” into the land of the “Old Gods.” Guided by a restless quest for adventure and the wanderlust of his favored god, Odinn, Thorgils’ fortunes will take him into worlds of unimaginable danger and discovery.


Odinn’s Child was one of my first real experiences into the historical fiction genre and Viking culture as a whole.

I had been a fan of history and fantasy since I started reading, but most of the stories that I experienced and fell in love with up to this point were Ancient Mediterranean or the Middle Ages.

Knights. Dragons. Magical swords. Castles.

Demi-Gods, Ancient heroes. Magical Monsters.

These were the stories that wowed me as a young reader, because Vikings, Ancient Egypt, and dozens of other cultures weren’t brought to my attention as much.

Odinn’s child changed that though. It opened my eyes to what the Vikings were, and the Norse Mythology that came along with them.


Norse Mythology, bloody battles, and a brief glimpse into the world of 1000s Europe, Odinn’s child is the first volume in the Viking Trilogy and all 350 odd pages will leave you wanting more.

The story follows a young boy, Thorgils Leiffson, the son of Leif the Lucky and Thorgunna as he arrives in Greenland to be fostered by a young woman – Gudrid.

Thorgils is a quick witted, intelligent, and very adaptable character that has inherited his mother’s ability of second sight.

Thorgils, who is basically orphaned, is raised by various mentors during his time in Greenland. They teach him the ways to worship the Norse Gods, along with their ancient customs, and warn him of the ‘White Christ’ that is making its way into the land of the ‘Old Gods’

Thorgils has a sense of adventure and looks to Odinn as his favoured god. Death, battle, disease, execution, and shipwreck are just some of the adventures that await Thorgils in Odinn’s child.


Severin does a good job of giving readers a steady look into Thorgils progression from a boy to a man.

He learns from several mentors, about many different things, but it never seems rushed, despite being contained within 350 odd pages.

The look into the Viking culture and the spread of Christianity into their lifestyle is an interesting plot for the book.

It’s not the major plot-line, but it nicely compliments the story and helps drive it forward by introducing new conflicts and characters.


Historical fiction isn’t a genre that I have delved too deeply into, but I want to get into the genre. I still have my copy of Odinn’s child from when I read it as a young teenager, and I might read it again to re-experience a series I loved as a kid.

Mistborn Review: A Hero’s Struggle

My Rating:  ★★★ ★ ☆

Author: Brandon Sanderson

Before I opened this book I wasn’t too sure about whether I’d like it. I love Brandon Sanderson and all the books of his that I have read so far have been amazing, but I read a few iffy reviews of Mistborn and was a bit nervous.

Those nerves quickly subsided when I started reading it though, cause I was hooked by the end of the first few chapters.

What really got me interested, which isn’t usually something I find in books, is that the entire plot of the book was laid out very early on.

The premise of the book is that there is a group of thieves and criminals, and they plan on overthrowing the government.

What’s beautiful about it though, is that their entire plan is spoken about. We know exactly what steps need to be taken in order for this all to work.

Some might think it’s annoying because there is less suspense, but I firmly disagree with that. I think there is so much opportunity for suspense and potential failure that the story benefits from it.

There are some cheesy moments that all books fall prey to. Two people falling in love after meeting one night, ruining the plans you’d have to kill them is the first one that comes to mind.

In knowing the overall story, we just know that something will go wrong. There’s no way that the story can go perfectly as planned right? There’s no way our heroes can do exactly what they need to, cause where’s the fun in seeing them succeed so easily?

There is a sort of joy in seeing heroes struggle, even though we want them to win.

It’s sort of weird if you think about it. We all want the hero to win, so why do we want him to suffer and struggle? Why shouldn’t he win easily? Why do we want the hero to get beaten, battered, bloody and bruised.

We should want him to complete his goals with ease.

But that’s boring.

A story wouldn’t be much fun if we didn’t overcome some obstacles. That’s what makes them a hero though. They are a hero because they overcome great adversity and triumph in the face of defeat and despair.

A hero that struggles and goes through pain is a hero because of it. Because all that pain and hardship is what relates us to the words on a page, or the character on the screen.

Mistborn gives us two main heroes. Two characters that are the same in so many ways, but so different too.


My one big complaint about Mistborn and the world it is in is the “magic” system. What’s cool about it, Allomancy as it’s called, is that it uses metals that are absorbed into your body.

What isn’t so cool is that you sort of forget what each power does over time. Some of the powers are used enough, or are written in a certain way that the meaning comes across in a memorable way, but there are just about as many that you confuse.

Without spoiling anything, there are 8 different “powers” and each sort of has an opposite. Some of the powers are easy to understand, and the names for them give away their meaning.

Some of them aren’t really used often enough, so when they are mentioned it takes you a second to remember what power is being used.

Overall, fantastic book. I have the other two books in this trilogy and can’t wait to get my hands on them, but I promised myself I’d take a crack at IT before going back to The Wheel of Time, which I need to read before coming back again to Mistborn.


My question to you is simple, what is your favourite magic system that you’ve read. Harry Potter’s straight up wand use, or maybe Twilight’s magical creatures? Is it Game of Thrones subtle magical world, or something else entirely? Let me know in the comments.

Book Review: The Dumbest Generation

Can a nation continue to enjoy political and economic predominance if its citizens refuse to grow up?

For decades, concern has been brewing about the dumbed-down popular culture available to young people and the impact it has on their futures. At the dawn of the digital age, many believed they saw a hopeful answer: The Internet, e-mail, blogs, and interactive and hyper-realistic video games promised to yield a generation of sharper, more aware, and intellectually sophisticated children. The terms “information superhighway” and “knowledge economy” entered the lexicon, and we assumed that teens would use their knowledge and understanding of technology to set themselves apart as the vanguards of this new digital era.

That was the promise. But the enlightenment didn’t happen. The technology that was supposed to make young adults more astute, diversify their tastes, and improve their verbal skills has had the opposite effect. According to recent reports, most young people in the United States do not read literature, visit museums, or vote. They cannot explain basic scientific methods, recount basic American history, name their local political representatives, or locate Iraq or Israel on a map. The Dumbest Generation is a startling examination of the intellectual life of young adults and a timely warning of its consequences for American culture and democracy.

Drawing upon exhaustive research, personal anecdotes, and historical and social analysis, Mark Bauerline presents an uncompromisingly realistic portrait of the young American mind at this critical juncture, and lays out a compelling vision of how we might address its deficiencies.

In the five or so minutes it will probably take you to read this, you will have logged roughly half the time the average 15- to 24-year-old now spends reading each day, assuming you even bother reading the entire post.

In a world where books and knowledge are at our fingertips, most people choose to avoid them at all costs, causing Mark Bauerlein, the author of The Dumbest Generation, fear for his country’s future.

The way Bauerlein says it, something disastrous has happened to America’s youth with the arrival of the instant gratification age we are currently in.

The result is a loss of knowledge, plain and simple.

Can we really blame people though? I mean what sounds like more fun, scrolling through Instagram or Facebook and checking out your friends’ newest post, or reading a book about Medieval warfare tactics?

Most people would choose Instagram or Facebook.

When Bauerlein told an audience of college students, “You are six times more likely to know who the latest American Idol is than you are to know who the speaker of the U.S. House is,” a voice in the crowd tells him: “ ‘American Idol’ IS more important.”

Young people are a melting pot of “unimportant” knowledge. The important stuff that affects our day to day life, is information we probably don’t know. A celebrities birthday and what their favourite gemstone is? Information we probably know.

And all this feeds on itself. Increasingly disconnected from the “adult” world of tradition, culture, history, context and the ability to sit down for more than five minutes with a book, today’s digital generation is becoming insulated in its own cocoon of bad spelling, civic illiteracy and endless postings. Two-thirds of U.S. undergraduates now score above average on the Narcissistic Personality Inventory, up 30% since 1982, he reports.

Now don’t get me wrong. It’s pretty well known that with each new generation, there will be some sort of inevitable change, and with that change will come complaints from the older generation, with reminiscence from the past, and so on, repeating in a never ending cycle.

This is not necessarily a bad thing, for many reasons. When cultural norms change, art, literature, and other creative outlets become more fluid, and people respond to the spirit of the age with an intelligent and relevant civic discourse.

Within Bauerlein’s collected research, some interesting information has come to light.The fact-based, multiple-choice approach to education has hampered our ability to “think historically,” meaning young Americans have difficulties placing current events in relation to their historical contexts.

Equally, our ability to do basic math and our reading proficiency continues to drop. In a 2005 survey cited in the book, respondents aged 15-to-24 only read anything for eight minutes on a weekday and nine minutes on the weekend, while clocking hours and hours watching TV or surfing the Internet. These are just a few shockers that Bauerlein reveals, but not all of his statistical evidence points toward depressing trends.

At the same time, technology is making our IQ’s go up, and Bauerlein reveals how IQ tests have become more complex to meet our growing intelligence.

If you’re reading this blog post, you probably don’t apply to this book as much as others, but it is never the less something that worries me. How can I trust my future to a bunch of people who ate tide pods and can’t go without their phones for more than five minutes?