Quote of the Day: Norse Mythology

Quote of the Day: Norse Mythology

“Because,” said Thor, “when something goes wrong, the first thing I always think is, it is Loki’s fault. It saves a lot of time.” 
― Neil Gaiman, Norse Mythology

“Of course it was Loki. It’s always Loki.” 
― Neil Gaiman, Norse Mythology

“He said nothing: seldom do those who are silent make mistakes.” 
― Neil Gaiman, Norse Mythology

“The Norse myths are the myths of a chilly place, with long, long winter nights and endless summer days, myths of a people who did not entirely trust or even like their gods, although they respected and feared them.” 
― Neil Gaiman, Norse Mythology

“Loki was not evil, although he was certainly not a force for good. Loki was . . . complicated.” 
― Neil Gaiman, Norse Mythology

“Fair enough,” said Thor. “What’s the price?” “Freya’s hand in marriage.” “He just wants her hand?” asked Thor hopefully. She had two hands, after all, and might be persuaded to give up one of them without too much of an argument. Tyr had, after all. “All of her,” said Loki. “He wants to marry her.” “Oh,” said Thor. “She won’t like that.” 
― Neil Gaiman, Norse Mythology

“Rebirth always follows death.” 
― Neil Gaiman, Norse Mythology

“That was the thing about Loki. You resented him even when you were at your most grateful, and you were grateful to him even when you hated him the most.” 
― Neil Gaiman, Norse Mythology

Loki makes the world more interesting but less safe. He is the father of monsters, the author of woes, the sly god.” 
― Neil Gaiman, Norse Mythology

“Cease your weeping!” he said. “It is I, Loki, here to rescue you!”
Idunn glared at him with red-rimmed eyes. “It is you who are the source of my troubles.” she said.
“Well, perhaps. But that was so long ago. That was yesterday’s Loki. Today’s Loki is here to save you and take you home.” 
― Neil Gaiman, Norse Mythology

“Loki’s green eyes flashed with anger and with admiration, for he loved a good trick as much as he hated being fooled.” 
― Neil Gaiman, Norse Mythology

“That is how the worlds will end, in ash and flood, in darkness and in ice. That is the final destiny of the gods.” 
― Neil Gaiman, Norse Mythology

No one, then or now, wanted to drink the mead that came out of Odin’s ass. But whenever you hear bad poets declaiming their bad poetry, filled with foolish similes and ugly rhymes, you will know which of the meads the have tasted.” 
― Neil Gaiman, Norse Mythology

“Loki was trying to look serious, but even so, he was smiling at the corners of his mouth. It was not a reassuring smile.” 
― Neil Gaiman, Norse Mythology

“One of the dwarfs walked in front of Thor to get a better view of the prye, and Thor kicked him irritably into the middle of the flames, which made Thor feel slightly better and made all the dwarfs feel much worse.”
― Neil Gaiman, Norse Mythology

“This will be the age of cruel winds, the age of people who become as wolves, who prey upon each other, who are no better than wild beasts. Twilight will come to the world, and the places where the humans live will fall into ruins, flaming briefly, then crashing down and crumbling into ash and devastation.” 
― Neil Gaiman, Norse Mythology

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Book Review: Norse Mythology

Book Review: Norse Mythology

Norse Mythology was a book I had on my radar the minute I heard about it. I’m extremely interested in all things mythology and history, as you should know by now, and Norse mythology has interested me since I was a teenager.

Greek and Roman myth are shoved down our throats time after time, but Norse myth has sort of taken a step back from stories and movies, until Thor became popular in the MCU.

I would argue that Marvel is one of the biggest reasons Norse myth and stories are still alive. Scholars and academics have been fascinated with them for a long time, but a big reason we don’t get to learn these stories as much as Greek or Roman is because there isn’t much to learn.

Not a lot of the stories and poems survived the test of time, which is unfortunate to those who want to know more.

Gaiman, in my opinion, does a wonderful job of taking these stories, written hundreds of years ago in a language few of us can understand, and turned them into something that modern audiences can enjoy.

I’d read one other book by Gaiman before this, but as most of us probably have heard, his reputation as an outstanding author precedes him.

Not only were the stories funny, interesting, and informative, I thought they were very thought provoking because they told the story in a way that allowed me to understand how some of these stories would have come about.

Most mythology books are a bit tough to get through, at best. If they’re written well, they are written as a story that is easy to follow, and not as a historical retelling.

At worst, they’re basically a translation from ancient Greek/Latin that put you to sleep more than they entertain you.

Norse Mythology was the best myth-related book I’ve read because it was like reading a bunch of short stories that really didn’t overlap at all, other than the characters involved.

If you know any of Norse myth stories, there’s a good chance you’ll find it in this book, along with all your favourite, or least favourite characters.

Thor, Loki, Odin, Baldur, Freya, they’re all there and more. You’ll learn about some gods you’ve never heard of, and even get to read about how a baby killed a blind man, and I’m not joking.

There are two things about Norse Mythology that I found kind of funny and that are also commonplace with most stories involving a “god” of some kind.

The first is that gods are assholes. No need for anything but being blunt, they’re assholes, and to them it’s always normal.

Bet a man he can’t build a wall in a month? Kill him because he is close to doing it. Jealous of Thor’s wife? Rip out her hair. Guy doesn’t want you coming into his home and drinking his mead? Kill him.

There are very few actual “good” gods in mythology. Yes some come across as good and all, but when it comes down to it, they’re usually assholes, and I kinda love it. I love that they are so clearly seeing themselves above everyone else.

The second thing that I love about a lot of mythological stories of gods is how “smart” they are.

Gods are so clever. They can outsmart any mere mortal. Except most of the time, they really aren’t that smart. Most of their problems they just solve by making themselves look like something else, or smashing them with a really big hammer.

Now to me, that doesn’t really seem that clever, but I like how the world and the gods think it is.

There’s one more thing I wanted to mention about Norse Mythology, and that’s how quickly I got through it.

Being used to taking a month or so to finish an 800 ish page fantasy book, I found that I flew through Norse Mythology extremely fast.

I started it on a Monday morning and had it done by Saturday afternoon, and most of the reading was done on the 20ish minute bus ride to and from work each day.

It wasn’t that the book was that short even, more so that it was that easy to read, which I think is a compliment to Gaiman’s abilities to write a book based off of established stories.

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