Top 10 Books On My TBR That I Am Avoiding

Top 10 Books On My TBR That I Am Avoiding

Top Ten Tuesday was created by The Broke and the Bookish in June of 2010 and was moved to That Artsy Reader Girl in January of 2018. It was born of a love of lists, a love of books, and a desire to bring bookish friends together.

The Once and Future King

This one has been read twice, but I’ve only ever made it halfway through. It’s a good book, but I want to read it consistently, not once every few months.

Les Miserables

If you own this book you know how daunting it is. Its basically a brick, put inside of a cinder block. Maybe when I’m 70 I’ll take my first shot at it.

Wizards First Rule

The first book of a giant fantasy series. As exciting as that sounds I can’t afford to buy the rest, and if I read and enjoy the first one I don’t know if I’ll be able to stop myself.

Strategy

I bought this book because it looked really interesting, but much like Les Miserables, it seems too daunting a task to take on right now.

IT

I actually planned on waiting till the second IT movie came out before I read this for the first time. I really enjoyed the movie so I thought I’d enjoy the movies first and see how different the book was after.

2001 A Space Odyssey

No real reason, just haven’t been in the mood for this one yet. I guess a part of me doesn’t want to be dissapointed by a classic.

Life of Pi

The movie was really good, but I remember the book was a bit tough to get through honestly. It’s been a few years since I tried so I’ll give it another shot soon.

Cloud Atlas

I had to read this book for school one year, but being the good student that I am, I used Spark Notes. Always wanted to get another shot at it, but I haven’t built up the willpower yet.

Collective Work of Sherlock Holmes

Sherlock Holmes is cool as hell, but I’m not sure I can read dozens of works all together. I’ve been thinking about reading a story at a time, whenever I have free time. Sort of deal with it in chunks.

Assassin’s Creed Series

I loved the video games, and have a few of the books, but I don’t really want to read these honestly. I mean I’ve played the games so I don’t really need to read the books…but I’ll probably cave and read them eventually.

Advertisements

HAPPY BIRTHDAY TO ME!!!

HAPPY BIRTHDAY TO ME!!!

Apparently today is my 1-year WordPress Anniversary.

To think a year ago I started this blog. It was not good. I’ve looked back at it and what was I thinking? haha

I know it grew along with me, and it’s still not great, but I think it’s getting there.

I have a few ideas that I want to do in the next year, but a couple of them require some interraction from my audiences which I don’t get a lot, other than a few followers.

So my first goal is increasing interactions with audiences. I want to talk to you guys, hear your opinions, see what you’re reading and stuff.

I’m also planning on doing a sort of book club on Twitch. The book club will mainly be me reading some short stories or books to people, throwing in some friendly chatting now and then.

The rest is a surprise. Now that I’ll have internet in my apartment soon I’ll be able to get the wheels turning on a few projects, but nothing too big. Expect a giveaway of some sort by Christmas time…maybe lol.

Anyways thanks to everyone who keep me writing this blog. I have a lot of fun writing for you guys and I assume you enjoy reading? Otherwise you probably wouldn’t follow me.

Book Review: The Dumbest Generation

Book Review: The Dumbest Generation

Can a nation continue to enjoy political and economic predominance if its citizens refuse to grow up?

For decades, concern has been brewing about the dumbed-down popular culture available to young people and the impact it has on their futures. At the dawn of the digital age, many believed they saw a hopeful answer: The Internet, e-mail, blogs, and interactive and hyper-realistic video games promised to yield a generation of sharper, more aware, and intellectually sophisticated children. The terms “information superhighway” and “knowledge economy” entered the lexicon, and we assumed that teens would use their knowledge and understanding of technology to set themselves apart as the vanguards of this new digital era.

That was the promise. But the enlightenment didn’t happen. The technology that was supposed to make young adults more astute, diversify their tastes, and improve their verbal skills has had the opposite effect. According to recent reports, most young people in the United States do not read literature, visit museums, or vote. They cannot explain basic scientific methods, recount basic American history, name their local political representatives, or locate Iraq or Israel on a map. The Dumbest Generation is a startling examination of the intellectual life of young adults and a timely warning of its consequences for American culture and democracy.

Drawing upon exhaustive research, personal anecdotes, and historical and social analysis, Mark Bauerline presents an uncompromisingly realistic portrait of the young American mind at this critical juncture, and lays out a compelling vision of how we might address its deficiencies.

In the five or so minutes it will probably take you to read this, you will have logged roughly half the time the average 15- to 24-year-old now spends reading each day, assuming you even bother reading the entire post.

In a world where books and knowledge are at our fingertips, most people choose to avoid them at all costs, causing Mark Bauerlein, the author of The Dumbest Generation, fear for his country’s future.

The way Bauerlein says it, something disastrous has happened to America’s youth with the arrival of the instant gratification age we are currently in.

The result is a loss of knowledge, plain and simple.

Can we really blame people though? I mean what sounds like more fun, scrolling through Instagram or Facebook and checking out your friends’ newest post, or reading a book about Medieval warfare tactics?

Most people would choose Instagram or Facebook.

When Bauerlein told an audience of college students, “You are six times more likely to know who the latest American Idol is than you are to know who the speaker of the U.S. House is,” a voice in the crowd tells him: “ ‘American Idol’ IS more important.”

Young people are a melting pot of “unimportant” knowledge. The important stuff that affects our day to day life, is information we probably don’t know. A celebrities birthday and what their favourite gemstone is? Information we probably know.

And all this feeds on itself. Increasingly disconnected from the “adult” world of tradition, culture, history, context and the ability to sit down for more than five minutes with a book, today’s digital generation is becoming insulated in its own cocoon of bad spelling, civic illiteracy and endless postings. Two-thirds of U.S. undergraduates now score above average on the Narcissistic Personality Inventory, up 30% since 1982, he reports.

Now don’t get me wrong. It’s pretty well known that with each new generation, there will be some sort of inevitable change, and with that change will come complaints from the older generation, with reminiscence from the past, and so on, repeating in a never ending cycle.

This is not necessarily a bad thing, for many reasons. When cultural norms change, art, literature, and other creative outlets become more fluid, and people respond to the spirit of the age with an intelligent and relevant civic discourse.

Within Bauerlein’s collected research, some interesting information has come to light.The fact-based, multiple-choice approach to education has hampered our ability to “think historically,” meaning young Americans have difficulties placing current events in relation to their historical contexts.

Equally, our ability to do basic math and our reading proficiency continues to drop. In a 2005 survey cited in the book, respondents aged 15-to-24 only read anything for eight minutes on a weekday and nine minutes on the weekend, while clocking hours and hours watching TV or surfing the Internet. These are just a few shockers that Bauerlein reveals, but not all of his statistical evidence points toward depressing trends.

At the same time, technology is making our IQ’s go up, and Bauerlein reveals how IQ tests have become more complex to meet our growing intelligence.

If you’re reading this blog post, you probably don’t apply to this book as much as others, but it is never the less something that worries me. How can I trust my future to a bunch of people who ate tide pods and can’t go without their phones for more than five minutes?

Solve it Sunday: A Curious Thought

Solve it Sunday: A Curious Thought

This one might be a bit trickier than you think. It got me when I first read it, but read it carefully before you think you have the answer.

As always…answers in the comments

It has been said that the ultimate in exclusivity would be to build a house which possessed windows facing south on each of its four sides.

Does this seem a reasonable proposition?

Solve it Sunday: Fibonacci’s Game

Solve it Sunday: Fibonacci’s Game

This mathematical party game was devised in the thirteenth century by the Italian mathematician Leonardo Pisano, known to the modern world as Fibonacci. His work on the mathematical system helped to set up the Renaissance, but the matter we will address here is less weighty.

Between two and nine people sit in a line, and together, they secretly conspire to select one of their number.

This person picks a finger joint of one of their hands, either where their ring is being worn, or where the volunteer nominates as a spot where he or she would like to have a ring.

The volunteer then takes their position in the line, doubles it, adds 5, multiplies by 5, and then adds 10 to the total.

Then the number of the ring-bearing finger across the two hands is counted and added (starting with the left little finger as 1), and the value is multiplied by 10.

Finally a number for the knuckle joint is added on, 1 for the joint nearest the hand, 3 for the tip joint. This gives a final total.

“When the number is announced,” Fibonacci says, “it is easy to pinpoint the ring.”

Can you see how?

Join My “Book Club”

Join My “Book Club”

As a book lover, I’m always interested in what other people are reading to see if I might enjoy it myself. I also like discussing theories and ideas for books that are coming out.

I have a very limited circle of friends, and my experiences are limited to my regular schedule, so I don’t often get to experience what books other people are interested in. Plus being busy most days I don’t get to be involved in the regular chatter and excitement of upcoming books.

That’s why I decided to come up with the idea for a little community “book club”.

It won’t be a scheduled book club. I’m not planning on making people read certain books by a certain date or anything. I just figured I should make a community of book loving people, whether you’re a blogger or not, who want to talk about books, get opinions, and talk about what’s coming up.

It’ll all be hosted on Discord, so it’s not anything formal. There will be some rules against profanity and such, but other than that there will be channels depending on what book you want to talk about.

I’ll throw in a link here: https://discord.gg/sNYTree for you to follow if you’re interested. It’s still a work in progress, but you’re more than welcome to join. If you want a certain channel made, let me know and we can make one.

I’d love to see some people join the “book” club to talk about what books their interested in right now, or talk about the latest in book news. I think it’s a good chance to bring the global book community together for some fun.

Book Review: Norse Mythology

Book Review: Norse Mythology

Norse Mythology was a book I had on my radar the minute I heard about it. I’m extremely interested in all things mythology and history, as you should know by now, and Norse mythology has interested me since I was a teenager.

Greek and Roman myth are shoved down our throats time after time, but Norse myth has sort of taken a step back from stories and movies, until Thor became popular in the MCU.

I would argue that Marvel is one of the biggest reasons Norse myth and stories are still alive. Scholars and academics have been fascinated with them for a long time, but a big reason we don’t get to learn these stories as much as Greek or Roman is because there isn’t much to learn.

Not a lot of the stories and poems survived the test of time, which is unfortunate to those who want to know more.

Gaiman, in my opinion, does a wonderful job of taking these stories, written hundreds of years ago in a language few of us can understand, and turned them into something that modern audiences can enjoy.

I’d read one other book by Gaiman before this, but as most of us probably have heard, his reputation as an outstanding author precedes him.

Not only were the stories funny, interesting, and informative, I thought they were very thought provoking because they told the story in a way that allowed me to understand how some of these stories would have come about.

Most mythology books are a bit tough to get through, at best. If they’re written well, they are written as a story that is easy to follow, and not as a historical retelling.

At worst, they’re basically a translation from ancient Greek/Latin that put you to sleep more than they entertain you.

Norse Mythology was the best myth-related book I’ve read because it was like reading a bunch of short stories that really didn’t overlap at all, other than the characters involved.

If you know any of Norse myth stories, there’s a good chance you’ll find it in this book, along with all your favourite, or least favourite characters.

Thor, Loki, Odin, Baldur, Freya, they’re all there and more. You’ll learn about some gods you’ve never heard of, and even get to read about how a baby killed a blind man, and I’m not joking.

There are two things about Norse Mythology that I found kind of funny and that are also commonplace with most stories involving a “god” of some kind.

The first is that gods are assholes. No need for anything but being blunt, they’re assholes, and to them it’s always normal.

Bet a man he can’t build a wall in a month? Kill him because he is close to doing it. Jealous of Thor’s wife? Rip out her hair. Guy doesn’t want you coming into his home and drinking his mead? Kill him.

There are very few actual “good” gods in mythology. Yes some come across as good and all, but when it comes down to it, they’re usually assholes, and I kinda love it. I love that they are so clearly seeing themselves above everyone else.

The second thing that I love about a lot of mythological stories of gods is how “smart” they are.

Gods are so clever. They can outsmart any mere mortal. Except most of the time, they really aren’t that smart. Most of their problems they just solve by making themselves look like something else, or smashing them with a really big hammer.

Now to me, that doesn’t really seem that clever, but I like how the world and the gods think it is.

There’s one more thing I wanted to mention about Norse Mythology, and that’s how quickly I got through it.

Being used to taking a month or so to finish an 800 ish page fantasy book, I found that I flew through Norse Mythology extremely fast.

I started it on a Monday morning and had it done by Saturday afternoon, and most of the reading was done on the 20ish minute bus ride to and from work each day.

It wasn’t that the book was that short even, more so that it was that easy to read, which I think is a compliment to Gaiman’s abilities to write a book based off of established stories.

%d bloggers like this: