Ultimate Blog Tour: The Die of Death

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Title: The Die of Death (The Great Devil War II)
Author: Kenneth B. Andersen
Rating: ★★★★☆

Philip’s adventures as the Devil’s apprentice have changed him—in a good way. Although he misses his friends in Hell, he has made new friends in life.
But when the future of the underworld is threatened once again, Philip’s help is needed. Death’s Die has been stolen and immortality is spreading across the globe.
Philip throws himself into the search—and discovers a horrible truth about his own life along the way.

The Die of Death is volume 2 in The Great Devil War-series and winner of the ORLA-Award.

The Great Devil War-series is a humorous and gripping tale about good and evil, filled with biblical and historical characters, such as Judas, Goliath, and Pontius Pilate, as well as modern figures such as Elvis Presley, Albert Einstein, Winston Churchill, and many more.

Hello my dear readers, it is finally my stop on The Ultimate Blog Tour! For this tour, a bunch of us bloggers took a look at Book 2 in The Great Devil War series by Kenneth B. Andersen.

I was pleasantly surprised by the first book, and immediately jumped at the opportunity to read the second book.

Before I begin, I just want to let you know that I received this book for free in return for an honest review.

Shall we get going?


The Character of Phillip

Phillip comes off a bit juvenile in this book, maybe even a little more so than he did in the first one. I’m hit and miss on this aspect.

On one hand, it’s nice seeing a kid be a kid and have an innocent point of view. On the other hand, it almost seems fake, because that’s now what kids are like any more.

Though he seemed a bit predictable at times, I didn’t think any of his actions were too obvious that it ruined the book for me

I think Phillip knocked Satina out of the spotlight a bit, which isn’t necessarily bad, but she was one of the things I enjoyed about the series so far, and I wanted to see her a bit more this book.


The Worldbuilding

Worldbuilding is something that I look for in books. It is one of the things that can easily turn me on or off to a book.

Andersen does a good job at worldbuilding, in my opinion. I think he did a great job in the first book, and kept that going in this book.

Though we are already somewhat familiar with Phillip’s world, we got a bit of a peak behind the curtains to Purgatory and Heaven in this book.


YA Category

Though I would consider this book Young Adult, it definitely is nearer middle years. Yes, it is a bit dark, but it comes off very child-like to me. If the dark aspect of the book wasn’t present, I think this book would definitely be middle years.

I don’t read a lot of YA these days, but I pick one up now and then, and it’s refreshing. They’re usually simple reads with interesting premises, so I enjoy exploring their pages.

This was definitely true for The Die of Death. It was a lot of fun diving deeper into the world that I enjoyed so much in the first book.


Slow and Steady Doesn’t Win the Race

Anderson’s pacing is one of his strengths when it comes to his writing. He seems to have mastered the pacing of the books in the series, knowing exactly when to press on the gas, and when to ease up just a little bit.

He makes it feel a bit stressful. Like there’s always something happening, and that the stakes are high.

This helps add to the connections you feel with the characters. You feel like they’ve achieved something, like they’ve failed or succeeded in their goals.


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If you do a little digging, it won’t be hard to find a bunch of other bloggers with reviews out there of this book. It was a lot of fun to read, and I can’t wait till I can get to book 3!

Let’s talk about The Die of Death in the comments, or on the social media!
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A Fitting Romance: Prodigy by Marie Lu Review

Title: Prodigy
Author: Marie Lu
Rating: ★★★★☆

Hello my fellow Prodigies, we’re looking at Book #2 of the Legend Series by Marie Lu today. This series was one I fell in love with back in high school, and enjoyed thoroughly. I followed up with it till the end, and I am happy to share my thoughts with you today.

Injured and on the run, it has been seven days since June and Day barely escaped Los Angeles and the Republic with their lives. Day is believed dead having lost his own brother to an execution squad who thought they were assassinating him. June is now the Republic’s most wanted traitor. Desperate for help, they turn to the Patriots – a vigilante rebel group sworn to bring down the Republic. But can they trust them or have they unwittingly become pawns in the most terrifying of political games?

Now it has been some time since I read this book, but there was one thing that I remember sticking out to me. I read it during the time when The Hunger Games, Maze Runner, and all the other Young Adult series were really taking off, but Prodigy stood out to me.

It wasn’t as simple as an exciting book, filled with teens getting into insane action packed fights, doing death defying stunts, and saving the world.

It was characters, solving the puzzles and hardships of their environments, trying to make it a better place. It was much deeper rooted than kids with bows and arrows, its dilemmas and principles at the forefront of the conflict. It’s making that hard choice in order to do what you think is right.

That’s what makes Prodigy so brilliant.

Prodigy doesn’t fall prey to being a sequel, which too often don’t live up to expectations. Prodigy doesn’t just live at the same level of Legend, it exceeds it. Prodigy goes deeper, and doesn’t pull its punches.


There is also the very obvious romance. Sometimes romance can ruin a book. It’s forced, or poorly executed, or unnecessary.

With Prodigy, it seems more natural. It seems like it belongs. Day and June don’t fall in love because of circumstance. That is a factor, but they fall in love, because of the chemistry they have. They see the world from two sides of the same coin.

They each grew up in different worlds, but they both analyze their environments, process the information, and come to their own conclusions.

Day and June are so similar. You could probably mistake the two of them at times, but the two different worlds they lived in makes their connection that much stronger.


What did you think of Prodigy? If you haven’t read it, it’s a great YA book to read that has a bit of action and romance mixed together.
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2001: A Space Odyssey Movie Review

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Title: 2001: A SPace Odyssey
Director: Stanley Kubrick
Rating: ★☆☆☆☆

Hello sci-fi lovers, I hope I don’t ruin your day today. Since I reviewed the book of this movie earlier this week, I thought it would make sense to review the movie.

Well…I regret this decision 100%

To sum up this entire review in one sentence, this movie was BORING!

I read the book, very recently, so I know what happens pretty much every minute. I know the story that should appear on screen, I know how exciting it could be.

The problem is that there is too much happening, but at the same time, nothing happens.

Shots linger far too long. There’s probably half the movie that could be cut out because a shot that should be 10-15 seconds lingers for two minutes. It’s not even done for cinematic purpose, no cool acting moments, nothing. They’re just boring shots that hang for far too long.

Keir Dullea in a scene from the film ‘2001: A Space Odyssey’, 1968. (Photo by Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer/Getty Images)

The story itself was fine. It followed the book as well as it could, and didn’t skip the good stuff.

I think the story in general is lacking. I wanted more of a struggle with HAL, I wanted there to be tension, but there wasn’t.

I’ve found out there are other Space Odyssey books, so maybe there is more depth to the storyline.

The acting wasn’t amazing, but I’ll allow it because it is more than 50 years old.


I tried imagining that the reason the movie is so boring is because it was made so long ago, but I don’t think thats the case.

I just think that there wasn’t enough of a story to be adapted to a feature length film, and Kubrik wanted to show off the “cool new space movie” to people by prolonging shots.

I wish I could have experienced it back in the day, with a fresh perspective, but I don’t get that luxury.

Maybe it was the visual marvel I imagine it to be, or maybe not. It’s hard to say.

What I can say is that I was disappointed with the movie.


What did you think of 2001: A Space Odyssey? Maybe I am just the outlier that hates the movie. Let’s talk about it in the comments or on the social media the kids love these days.
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When Your Computer Has A Mind of Its Own

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Title: 2001: A Space Odyssey
Rating: ★★★★☆
Author: Arthur C. Clark

I got through 2001: A Space Odyssey pretty quick, and it was never boring. I was actually surprised at what happened at a few times in the book.

When a book has “Space” and “Odyssey” in the title, you probably assume laser gun fights, space ships blasting off into space, and alien life forms with five eyes and four legs.

Now this book has a space ship, it has alien life forms, but does not have laser gun fights.

But, the book actually starts with a bunch of cavemen, and it was honestly some of the best writing I have ever read.

The simplicity in the cavemen’s thoughts and actions and their interactions with the alien life forms.


When we do finally get into the “modern” story line, I love that we get to see the advanced society that humans are living in, in a time that is before our time.

The story takes place in the early 2000s, and they have a more advanced society than we do in some ways, but in others it is similar.

We follow two astronauts in their trip into deep space with their trust AI computer to help them.

You can imagine what happens…the computer rises up and tries to take control of the ship.

This part of the book is the only reason I didn’t give it a five-star rating. I wanted more of a build up of tension. I wanted there to be more of a conflict between man and machine…but instead it was over just as quickly as it started.

Keir Dullea in a scene from the film ‘2001: A Space Odyssey’, 1968. (Photo by Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer/Getty Images)

We don’t get the build up, the conflict, and the resolution that I was hoping for. It’s not that the writing is bad. I was captivated through the entire book, it just didn’t seem quite complete.

The end of the story was interesting, and though I think it lead the story in an interesting direction, it really split it up into three very distinct parts.

Theres a beauty to a short story. It tells you an entire story, but it leaves you wanting more. It leaves you incomplete, but yet complete at the same time.

2001: A Space Odyssey has a similar feel to it, but I’d say its a step below. To put it in simple terms, a good short story tells ~50% of a story, and leaves the rest to your imagination. This book would more accurately be ~75% of a story. It tells you a lot, but it’s not quite in either category.


What did you think of 2001: A Space Odyssey? Let’s chat in the comments. Look for a review of the movie this weekend.
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Blackthorn Book Tours: The Unholy, by Paul DeBlaisse III

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Title: The Unholy
Author: Paul DeBlaisse III
Rating: 3 / 5

“A young curandera, a medicine woman, intent on uncovering the secrets of her past is forced into a life-and-death battle against an evil archbishop. Set in the mystic land of Aztlan, “The Unholy” is a novel of destiny as healer and slayer. Native lore of dreams and visions, shape changing, and natural magic work to spin a neo-gothic web in which sadness and mystery lure the unsuspecting into a twilight realm of discovery and decision.”

Before I begin, I want to say that I received this book from Blachthorn Book Tours in return for an honest review! I’m happy to be a part of the Blackthorn Book Tours team, and look forward for more tours in the future.

If this book was about only one thing, it would be about struggle. Whether internal or external, this book captures struggle in a brilliant way. 

I haven’t read too many books that delve too deep into the idea of religion, and even fewer that show religion as a bad thing, but I think The Unholy was a nice touch to both. 

The main character Claire is having a sort of internal struggle about whether she can and should embrace her culture, that she was raised with, or fall to Christianity, which rules with an iron fist in her town.


Just because one person feels relief and freedom in religion, but to others it can be the cause for abuse, suffering, and long-lasting pain. 

Personally, I’m not big on religion, but I enjoyed seeing two sides of the conflict, which were both different perspectives than my own. 

Common stereotypes about religion are broken, and the battle between good and evil isn’t as clear cut as people might assume.


I enjoyed the struggle in the book, and though this book wasn’t my favourite, I did appreciate it for what it was. It was a thought provoking piece and had very few things wrong about it. 

Other than a few parts of the story being harder to follow, some grammatical and structural issues, and a few loose ends being left at the end of the story, I don’t have much to complain about.

It wasn’t a bad story per se, it just wasn’t completely for me.

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Have you read The Unholy, or other books by Paul DeBlaisse III? Let’s talk about it in the comments, or follow me on social media.
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Falling In Love With Your Phone – A Movie Review

Hello dear lovebirds, I hope your Valentine’s Day was lovely and full of happiness, whether that was on your own, or with a loved one.

Today I am going to be talking about a movie that might become all too real in the near future – Her, starring Joaquin Phoenix.

Theodore Twombly, an introvert writer, buys an Artificial Intelligence system to help him write. However, amazed by the AI’s ability to learn and adapt, he falls in love with it.

Her explores a near future of our world where people are falling in love with an artificial intelligence on their phones, and the life people live when that is the case.

Before I dive into the social commentary the movie has, I want to mention two things first. The acting and the look and feel of the movie itself.


The movie is rather slow paced and tame. There really isn’t much action, but I never felt bored. I never felt like the movie was dragging on, because it’s a romantic movie. You fall in love with the characters as they fall in love together. We are there for their highs and their lows, and we get to see a beautiful relationship blossom.

One character happens to be a human male, the other a cell phone being carried around in a shirt pocket.

It wouldn’t be a romantic movie without the struggle between the two love interests. The thing that puts their relationship on trial. The event that either makes it or breaks it.

Except in this movie, when the main character’s reality crumbles before his eyes, we feel it too. We feel his pain and his sorrow, but we aren’t surprised. We knew it was going to happen, but we needed the emotional trauma regardless.


The look of the movie is also brilliant. Most movies have a style. They have a color palette they follow, a style to the characters, but Her seems to capture it perfectly.

The colors are muted for the most part, but not bland. They look great, and the odd moments of colors popping to the foreground complement the whole vision, and make it come to life.


In terms of the larger social commentary, Her speaks to the addiction we all have to our devices. Our society almost requires them, and I think Her is going to become a reality to an extent.

I don’t know if we will be at the same point, but we have all heard stories of people marrying sex robots and falling love with fake women.

What’s to say your phone won’t be the next thing we fall in love with? Sure, it won’t advance our evolutionary prospects, but in a world where people are having a hard time finding that true love, maybe their phone will be the thing that we fall in love with.


Do you think people will fall in love with their phones? I wouldn’t be opposed if Scarlett Johansson was the voice of my Siri. Let’s talk about it on social media!
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Book Review: The Fault In Our Stars

Hello my lovely lovebirds, welcome to a special Valentine’s Day themed book review.

Valentine’s Day is just around the corner, and since we all need a little love in our lives, I thought I’d review one of the few romance books I have ever read.

Title: The Fault In Our Stars
Author: John Green
Rating: 3.5 / 5

I read this book as a suggestion from a friend, and the only thing they really told me, other than it was good, was that I would cry.

I’m not an emotional reader, so I didn’t think I would cry at all when I first started the book, buy did I ever lose that bet to myself.

I don’t think the book was particularly well written, and the plot wasn’t overly complicated, but it did strike me in the feelings.


The plot is straightforward. We follow a couple of teenagers that have various life-threatening illnesses as the lose loved ones, fall in love, and struggle with their painful realities.

Again, not an overly hard plot, but for some reason it really hit home with me.

I’m not sure why, but I think it has something to do with the fact that it is loosely based off a real story. Having that knowledge that someone went through these things (I repeat loosely based) made it that much more emotional to me.


Maybe that’s the point of romance books. They’re not supposed to be difficult to follow, but instead they connect with you on a personal level.

I’m no expert, but maybe I am on to something (he says with a heavy dose of sarcasm).

I never expected myself to cry, but I started feeling for the characters, and I think that is what was my downfall. I fell prey to Green’s every word, until they attached themselves to my very soul, before being ripped out.

I think Green did the best job of any author I can think of in that aspect. Plenty of authors that I read do a good job of putting you in a story, right beside the characters, but I can’t think of any that made me feel quite so emotionally connected with the characters.


Thinking back on my time reading the book, I don’t know why I gave up on romance novels.

I never read a lot of them, but the limited few that I have read have left a positive impact on me. I think I might make that a self goal in the next year, to read a handful more, but I don’t mind sticking with fantasy for now.

Have you read The Fault In Our Stars, or do you have any suggestions of other romance books I might enjoy? Let me know in the comments or on social media.
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