Supernatural Season 4

Supernatural Season 4

I apologize now for the late review of Season 4. I opened up my laptop yesterday, that was plugged in all night, and found it dead and not charging.

Eventually I went to Apple and bought a new cord, but that didn’t really fit into my schedule so I had to forgo posting yesterday unfortunately.

Season 4 sees Supernatural coming to an end of what was the original intended length, and the story clearly points to it.

Dean unknowingly broke open the first of 66 seals, and the boys and their new angel “allies” are working to prevent the other 65 from breaking and releasing Lucifer.

The brothers let some seals break and stop some from breaking. They work with these angels to stop the demons, but slowly we learn that more and more seals are being broken.

Dean is told that he will be the one to stop all of this, but Sam is the one that is actively working on his demon powers to get strong enough to stop Lilith, to the chagrin of all his allies and loved ones.

We get to meet Castiel for the first time this season (FINALLY!) and we also get Chuck near the end of it.

Overall the season is pretty good. I still prefer Season 3, but I would rank this one above Season 1 and 2.

This season was back to it’s full length of 22 ish episodes, and we get a nice variety again between main story enemies and random ones along the way.

Even some of the ones we thought were random turned out to be related to the overall story.

If you’re a fan of folklore and history like I am though, this show never seems to disappoint in terms of teaching you something. It’s fascinating to see the different culture’s ghosts and ghouls be brought to light in a more modern setting.

There are two interesting ideas that kept coming to mind whenever I would see Sam using his powers and Dean not liking a moment of it.

Family, and Responsibility.


Let’s get into the what I mean by responsibility.

Now Sam is a hunter, and we learn he has some pretty extraordinary powers–he is immune to the demon push thing and he can kill/exercise demons with his mind. Pretty sweet when your big enemy is a demon and they can’t touch you.

Unfortunately, Sam needs to drink demon blood to get stronger, and it slowly gets him addicted to it, and at the beck and call to Ruby.

I kept thinking back to the classic Spider-Man line: “With great power comes great responsibility,” and how it related to Sam.

Sam could defeat Lilith and potentially stop the war, but does he have to? Should he sacrifice his sanity and potentially his life just because he is maybe the only thing that could stop Lilith?

It would be possible to stop her without Sam’s powers. It wouldn’t be easy but it would be possible. Should Sam sacrifice himself for the greater good? It’s a problem heroes face all the time in storytelling.

Thinking logically, what if there was a bigger threat than Lilith and Sam could stop that one too. He could stop the enemy that would cause the more damage. But what if he sacrificed himself for Lilith instead, making him never able to sacrifice himself for what came next.

What do you think? Is Sam responsible to sacrifice himself for the threat at hand?


I also wanted to talk about what the word “family” means for a bit.

Sam and Dean are obviously blood brothers, and they feel responsible for each other’s actions.

Family is a big theme in Season 4, because Dean sees Sam slowly slip into darkness the more demon blood he consumes.

Eventually Dean can no longer handle it, and tries to give up on Sam. He tries to forget his responsibility to Sam because to him, Sam is hopeless. Sam can’t be saved any more.

But we all know Dean, and after a great line from Bobby “You think family is supposed to make you warm and happy? That’s why they’re family. They’re supposed to make you miserable,” Dean caves and reaches out to Sam.

Now to the question I wanted to ask.

Can and should you give up on family?

I know everyone will have a different idea on the matter, but I think its a worthwhile debate. Assume you’ve done all you can for your family. You’ve helped them out of scrape after scrape, yet they keep doing whatever they think is best, even though it’s so clearly wrong.

Dean gave up on his brother for a moment, and I’m sure he hates himself for it and won’t forget it till the day he dies, but that’s who Dean is.


I hope everyone enjoyed the review. Look out for Season 5, hopefully next Saturday because there won’t be any issues that come up (fingers crossed).

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Supernatural Season 3 Review

Supernatural Season 3 Review

Sorry this is a day late, but I was late for work yesterday and didn’t get home till almost midnight, but don’t worry, you didn’t miss out on another review.

I’m just gonna be blunt about this season, it is awesome. I think the writer’s strike that was happening at the time and causing there to only be 16 episodes was a stroke of luck. It just seemed so much more compact and there was no extra fluff in the season

There was the right amount of hilarity, seriousness and overall story. We know right form the hop that Dean only has one year to live, before the hell hounds come for him, and we slowly see him go from “I’m going to die in a year I can do whatever I want” to “I don’t wanna die Sammy.”

Bella was a great addition to the season. She is a thief that has a few run ins with the Winchesters, and unfortunately she doesn’t turn herself around in the end, eventually paying her end of her deal with her life.

She added a sort of rival to the brothers, with a bit of sexual tension and humour when she’d outsmart Dean.

We also get one of the most touching moments in the series. There’s a Christmas episode, and Dean wants to have one last Christmas with his brother. Sam doesn’t agree at first because he’s not a fan of Christmas, but eventually the two brothers swap gifts and spend some time watching the game together.

Dean eventually succumbs to the deal he made, but we all know he’s gonna be back right?

I think the “brother” aspect of the show really came out to shine in this season. There was more of the brotherly bickering present, but at the same time the understanding of each other’s every move. At this point they would have spent years together on the road, and we can see it in simple frustrations, and the way they perfectly bounce off each other.

Season 3 is the start of the end of the original proposed show’s run time, and you can tell by its solid storytelling, character development, and lack of cheesy plotholes.

Overall season rankings:
Season 3
Season 2
Season 1

Movie Review: Toy Story 4

Movie Review: Toy Story 4

Toy story is a movie that most of you have seen and or grown up with. They are some of the best kids movies around, and we all probably had a little Buzz or Woody toy at some point in time.

I was okay with Toy Story 2, and 3 nearly had me in tears a few times, and I was perfectly happy with how it ended at the end of Toy Story 3.

I didn’t need, or necessarily even want a Toy Story 4, but I heard it was pretty good so I figured I should go watch it.

Overall, it was a good movie. I liked how it ventured into a different set of toys, and that the bad guy turned good in the end.

My problem with it, is that I don’t think it was necessary. The ending seems kind of odd to me, but it did raise some interesting questions in my mind.

It seems like they just made the movie because of the money they would make. I guess Woody is the main character of the entire series, but I didn’t really care about him in that way. He’s no longer the favourite toy of Andy, and so he just leaves. He leaves his friends behind because he’s not the top dog anymore.

To me it seemed sort of empty. There wasn’t much weight to it. Before he left, Woody was all about making sure Bonnie was happy and helping her cope with kindergarten, but then suddenly he wants to leave.

I get he wants to run away with the “woman” he loves, but his growth from having a child to wanting to run away seemed sort of forced to me, but that might just be me.

For the most part we see toys that are owned by someone, mainly Andy.

But what about toys that don’t have owners? What about toys you win at a carnival.

We kind of get to experience these things in Toy Story 4, which was really cool. I had never thought about that before, so exploring those questions a bit was interesting to me, but it did bring new questions to mind.

One thing I couldn’t stop imagining was what happened when toys were destroyed or when a toy is broken.

We dive into those ideas a little bit, but being a Disney/Pixar movie, there isn’t too much on it.

Movie Review: Midsommar

Movie Review: Midsommar

I’m a big fan of thriller and creepy movies, so when I saw the trailer for Midsommar I instantly wanted to go see it.

Most movies that have a secret cult in them are good for many reasons, and in my opinion Midsommar fit the bill perfectly.

I really enjoyed every minute of it, even though it was sort of predictable and i knew what certain things were that the main characters didn’t.

Ari Aster’s work, in my opinion, is not quite like any other director. I’m not a big movie nerd, but he has a way of throwing in those unknown gods and deities into his movies (Hereditary) that you don’t really see coming and it’s one of my favourite movie tropes.

My biggest issue with the movie, and with other Aster work is that the shots and the gore are absolutely beautiful, but the characters are sort of flat and don’t seem to have too much development.

I found Midsommar utterly transfixing, darkly comic, ravishing, and appropriately terrifying; despite a two-hour-and-20-minute running time, I was never inclined to wish that it were shorter, happy to put myself under the same strange Scandinavian spell as the one that seals the major characters to their fate.

Midsommar is a story about how relationships feel during a breakup. The whole movie is focused on the relationship between Dani (who was fantastic in my opinion) and Christian. They have their issues, and Christian is ready to break up with Dani before the worst thing happens, her parents and sister die tragically.

Things evolve and they both end up across the waters in northern Scandinavia, celebrating the summer solstice festival in a small commune. Off the hop you can just tell the commune is off, but the main characters don’t seem to notice anything is wrong. They take drugs, are excluded from a certain strange looking building, and even watch two elders jump off of a cliff, to which they don’t react too harshly.

The citizens of the commune don’t really take much effort to hide what’s going on, and come up with some pretty shitty lies to cover their tracks, or just opt for the straight up approach and tell them it’s tradition…to which the main characters sort of accept over and over.

One part of the movie I liked is that it takes place almost entirely in sunlight. Because it is summer, the sun doesn’t set for long in the northern part of the world, so the creepiness doesn’t get amplified by the darkness…but I don’t think it needs to. It does a hell of a job of being creepy with the constant sunlight.

I enjoyed the ending of the movie though. Dani, evidently wins in the end of their “relationship” and ends up staying with the commune, finally finding a place that she feels like she fits in, since she has been lost since her family died.

Have you seen Midsommar? What were your thoughts? Like it or hate it? Let me know in the comments

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