Solve it Sundays: Absolutely Nothing

Solve it Sundays: Absolutely Nothing

We are back for another Solve it Sundays, and this one I didn’t find too tricky. Good luck! and as always, the answers are in the comments.

 

It is tempting, soothing even, to think of mathematics as a perfect edifice of logic and order. The truth however is that it is an art as well as a science, and it has places where absolutism breaks down.

For this example, we will show that 0 = 1. Firstly, however, I should point out that when adding a series of numbers, the associative law says that you may bracket the sums as you like without any effect.

1+2+3 = 1+ (2+3)= (1+2) + 3.

So, with that established, consider adding an infinite number of zeroes. No matter how much nothing you gather, you will still always have nothing.

0 = 0+0+0+0+0+…

Since 1-1 = 0, you can replace each zero in your sum, like so:

0 = (1-1)+(1-1)+(1-1)+(1-1)+(1-1)+…

From the associative law, you may arrange the brackets in your sum as you see fit. Which means:

0 = 1+(-1+1)+(-1+1)+(-1+1)+(-1+1)+(-1+1)+…

However, as established, (-1+1) = 0, so this sequence can also be stated as:

0 = 1+0+0+0+0+0+…

Or, for simplicities sake:

0 = 1

Something is clearly incorrect. But what?

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Solve It Sundays: Bodies in Motion

Solve It Sundays: Bodies in Motion

So before I get into the puzzle, I wanted to introduce a new segment I wanted to start. I bought a book a few years ago called Einstein’s Puzzle Universe and I really enjoyed trying to solve the riddles, and I thought some of you would too.

Now you’re probably thinking, OH, it’s Einstein, there’s no way I can solve his riddles, he was a genius. Well that may be true for some of the riddles, but most of them can be solved with a bit of applied brain power! Good luck with them, and let me know what you think, or if you think you know the answers, let me know!

I WILL ADD THE ANSWERS IN THE COMMENTS SECTION, SO DON’T SCROLL DOWN THERE IF YOU DON’T WANT THE ANSWERS.

We are used to the idea, that it is possible to sit still, and pass time in a motionless manner. But this amazing planet of ours is very far from static. At all times, we are hurtling through the gulfs of space at astonishing velocities.

It may seem to casual thought that from the Sun’s viewpoint, all of Earth’s population is moving at the same speed. After all, our planet revolves around it at a steady 30km per second – anticlockwise, if we are looking from above the North Pole. However, there is another factor to consider. The Earth spins on its axis as it rotates, at a speed of around 28km per minute, if you are at the equator.

You know, of course, that from the surface of the planet, the Sun appears to rise in the east. So, are you moving more swiftly during the day, or at night?

I’ve found the best way to solve some of these puzzles is to imitate them, at least to a certain extent. Obviously you don’t have a planet in your back pocket, but I’m sure you have a few roundish shaped objects laying around you can use.

Let me know in the comments if you figured out the answer, and remember, DON’T SCROLL PAST THIS UNTIL YOU’VE SOLVED IT, OR HAVE GIVEN UP. Spoiler warning below.

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