10 Best Closing Lines in Books

Hello dear readers, we are back for another Top 10 Tuesdays, hosted by The Artsy Reader Girl!

This week’s theme is actually Top 10 Opening Lines, but I decided to go with my Top 10 Best Closing lines instead.

I am literally sitting on my floor, flipping through every book to find the best of the best closing lines of the books I own, so I hope you enjoy.

Closing lines are your last impression for the story. They can leave you in tears, or ruin all the time you invested in the journey. If you think about it, a closing line can be even more important than an opening line, and it is the opening line if you read the book backwards!

If you think of any other great closing lines, let me know in the comments or on social media!
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The Naruto Series

“Once upon a time there was a fox spirit with nine tails.
A boy had the fox sealed inside him, and the two spent a long time together.
A new calamity, the Juubi, was revived, but the boy became a shinobi, and together with the fox spirit and the other shinobi they became one and succeeded in sealing it.
The boy with the fox spirit inside him was the son of the Fourth Hokage. Now he is called the Seventh.

I think this is a great close to the entire Naruto series. We know the story of Naruto, and all the struggles he had to go through to get where he is now. This closing line is a very short summary, and it brings back a lot of memories.


The Book Thief

“I am haunted by humans”

The entire book humanizes the character of Death, the greatest evil that someone could imagine. For death to claim he is haunted by humans shows that we, not him, are the worst evils that can be imagined. A haunting final line.


Fullmetal Alchemist

“This is what’s best for them.
Besides, a guy who just sits around is boring.”

These words coming from Winry really tie in the final arc of Fullmetal Alchemist nicely. It is seen as a both romantic gesture as well as proof that the Elric’s stories aren’t over yet.


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In Cold Blood

“Then starting home, he walked toward the trees, and under them, leaving behind him the big sky, the whisper of wind voices in the wind-bent wheat.”

This chilling final line of In Cold Blood really wraps up Capote’s heart-wrenching story nicely.


IT

“Or so Bill Denbrough sometimes thinks on those early mornings after dreaming, when he almost remembers his childhood, and the friends with whom he shared it.”

If you know the story of IT, you know the significance of them remembering their childhood. With this closing line, they knew that the story was over, and that there was nobody left to haunt their memories.


Clockwork Princess

And if the Thame that ran beside them, sure and silver in the afternoon light, recalled a night long ago when the moon shone as brightly as a shilling on this same boy and girl, or if the stones of Blackfriars knew the tread of their feet and thought to themselves at last, the wheel comes full circle, they kept their silence.

You wouldn’t know half of the ending of this series from this closing line, but if you know the story, you know the impact it has on readers.

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The Eye of the World

“The Prophecies will be fulfilled,” the Aes Sedai whispered. “The Dragon is Reborn.”

This is a great set-up for the rest of the 14 book series. Though we had our suspicions, we now have a stage for the rest of the story.


Martin the Warrior

“There is always room for you and Bultip here, Aubretia. Our Abbey is a place for friendship. Anyone young or old, who has read or heard of Redwall may come and visit us. If you are honest and of good heart, no matter what the season our door is open to you. Whether for the first time, or for the return of an old companion, you are welcome. Please feel free to visit us anytime you pass by this way.”

This series will forever be one of my laborite series. This closing line perfectly encapsulates the essence of the story, and Redwall Abbey, which is often the main setting in the stories.


Priory of the Orange Tree

With the faintest smile, Ead cast her gaze towards the stars.
“One day, perhaps,” she said. “But not today.”

A sad, but hopeful ending to a great romance. This line leaves hope for Ead and Sabran, but it still hurts us a little bit knowing they can’t be together yet.


Champion

“Hi,” he says. “I’m Daniel.” 
“Hi,” I reply. “I’m June.”

This last line always gets me. After three books of romantic build up, this is the line we end with. On one hand you can’t help but feel sad, but on the other, you hold on to a bit of hope.


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What did you think of these closing lines? Are there any other closing lines that really stick out to you? Let’s talk about them in the comments, or send me a message on social media!
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Sabran IX Berethnet: A Queen of Legacy

Hello my dear readers. After many weeks of putting it down to finish other books, I finally finished The Priory of the Orange Tree.

This isn’t a review of the book, that will come some time in the future, hopefully soon. Instead, I want to analyze one of the main characters that stuck out to me during the book; Sabran IX, the ruler of the Queendom of Inys.

Some of these opinions might be seen as controversial, and if you agree or disagree with me, we should talk about it in the comments, or send me a message on social media.
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She’s Flawed

My favourite thing about Sabran is that she is far from perfect and confident. She is very much a flawed character, and that is what makes her story so much more interesting.

She is a young Queen, but a strong ruler.

She has her fears about having children, and pursues immortality instead. She has fears that plenty of young women have.

Childbirth can be a scary thing for anybody, even a queen. If the power of immortality was at your fingertips, wouldn’t you think of pursuing it too?

Samantha Shannon, author of The Priory of the Orange Tree

She’s Conflicted

Sabran has lived her entire life with other voices in her head, making decisions for her. She is the Queen, but she’s had advisors and other nobles limiting her freedom of thought.

Because of this, we see her doubt. We see her unsure of herself when she has a moment of privacy that the reader gets to explore. On the surface, she is a strong, more than capable queen. When we can tear wear the tough exterior, she is scared, she is unsure, she is exhausted.

It can’t be easy being a Queen, and when you’ve had a parentless existence like she has, you can imagine how lonely it can be.


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She’s Romantic

Marriage is one thing Sabran tried to avoid when she was young. She didn’t want to marry, she wanted to be immortal instead.

When love finally comes her way, it’s as if she dives into it head first. She opens herself up to it, and she enjoys it. All of her fears are put to the side, and she accepts the beautiful things that love can bring.

That’s when her world is torn apart.

Sabran finally accepts love. She realizes the good it can bring, and how happy it can make her, and then it is ripped from her.

Her husband and her child are taken from her. The two things she was terrified to go through with were torn from her, her fears come true.

The emotional and mental destruction that would bring on anyone. She spent years avoiding them, and it is almost as if her fears made it a reality.

When Sabran realizes her feelings for Ead, it’s as if her pieces are put back together, slowly, but much stronger.

Cover from Goodreads

She allows herself to feel again, despite all the pain and fear it has brought her.

This time, she finds the love of her life. She finds her other half, and even when she falls into more emotional moments, where Ead is in danger, she keeps a strong head and does what needs to be done.

She may love Ead, but she knows when she needs to be a lover and when she needs to be a fighter.


She’s Strong

It’s never directly stated, but it seems like Sabran’s ancestors have always suffered from depressive episodes.

It’s fairly well known, and Sabran experiences a few throughout the book.

What I like about her, is that she comes back from these dark moments, and she steps up when the time is right.

A thousand years of “destiny” and “prophecy” are on Sabran’s shoulders. She believes she is the sole reason that the end of the world is alive. She believes if her lineage ends, the Nameless One will rise and destroy the world.

When a High Welters, the strongest of the dragons besides the Nameless One, comes to her doorstep, she doesn’t hesitate in confronting it. She knows she could die with one swipe of its tail, but she confronts it as if she could kill it with her gaze alone.


She’s Wise

As we make it further into The Priory of the Orange Tree, the entirety of Sabran’s religion is tested more than once.

The truth to the origin story of her religion is proven wrong, and then wrong again.

Despite this, she is understanding, and she is open minded. She could remain ignorant, sticking to her beliefs of what her and her people have been taught for hundreds of years.

It would be the easiest thing for her to do, but she is willing to accept the truth to it all, and learn from it.

Fan art of Sabran IX from the PotOT Wiki

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Sabran’s character is far from perfect. She’s a bit of a bitch at times during the start of the book, but as we get to know her more and more, we understand why.

We understand her thoughts and actions more and more, and we realize she is an amazing character.

Sabran is definitely my favorite part of The Priory of the Orange Tree. She provides a wonderful emotional thread to the story, and it’s always refreshing to have a character that acts with her mind and heart, instead of just her heart.

Fan art of Sabran IX from the PotOT Wiki

What did you think of Sabran IX? I’d love to talk about her, or this book in the comments, or on social media.
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